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To Teach: The Journey, in Comics

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This graphic novel brings to life William Ayers's bestselling memoir To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher, Third Edition. From Ayers's early days teaching kindergarten, readers follow this renowned educational theorist on his "voyage of discovery and surprise." We meet fellow travelers from schools across the country and watch students grow across a year and a lifetime. To Teach i/>To This graphic novel brings to life William Ayers's bestselling memoir To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher, Third Edition. From Ayers's early days teaching kindergarten, readers follow this renowned educational theorist on his "voyage of discovery and surprise." We meet fellow travelers from schools across the country and watch students grow across a year and a lifetime. To Teach is a vivid, honest portrayal of the everyday magic of teaching, and what it means to be a "good" teacher--debunking myths perpetuated on film and other starry-eyed hero/teacher fictions. Illuminated by the evocative and wry drawings of Ryan Alexander-Tanner, this literary comics memoir is both engaging and insightful. These illustrated stories remind us how curiosity, a sense of adventure, and a healthy dose of reflection can guide us all to learn the most from this world. This dynamic book will speak to comic fans, memoir readers, and educators of all stripes.


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This graphic novel brings to life William Ayers's bestselling memoir To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher, Third Edition. From Ayers's early days teaching kindergarten, readers follow this renowned educational theorist on his "voyage of discovery and surprise." We meet fellow travelers from schools across the country and watch students grow across a year and a lifetime. To Teach i/>To This graphic novel brings to life William Ayers's bestselling memoir To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher, Third Edition. From Ayers's early days teaching kindergarten, readers follow this renowned educational theorist on his "voyage of discovery and surprise." We meet fellow travelers from schools across the country and watch students grow across a year and a lifetime. To Teach is a vivid, honest portrayal of the everyday magic of teaching, and what it means to be a "good" teacher--debunking myths perpetuated on film and other starry-eyed hero/teacher fictions. Illuminated by the evocative and wry drawings of Ryan Alexander-Tanner, this literary comics memoir is both engaging and insightful. These illustrated stories remind us how curiosity, a sense of adventure, and a healthy dose of reflection can guide us all to learn the most from this world. This dynamic book will speak to comic fans, memoir readers, and educators of all stripes.

30 review for To Teach: The Journey, in Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenell

    Enjoyed reading this more the second time around!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I enjoyed this book, and I'd recommend it to all my fellow teacher friends. There aren't many concepts presented in this book that are new and different, per se, but the presentation (as a graphic novel/comic book) is fresh. It's also always nice to have a friendly reminder of what it truly means to be a GOOD teacher. In light of all the discussions about the effectiveness of NCLB and standardized testing and whatnot... I think this book does a nice job of offering up potential solutions, or at I enjoyed this book, and I'd recommend it to all my fellow teacher friends. There aren't many concepts presented in this book that are new and different, per se, but the presentation (as a graphic novel/comic book) is fresh. It's also always nice to have a friendly reminder of what it truly means to be a GOOD teacher. In light of all the discussions about the effectiveness of NCLB and standardized testing and whatnot... I think this book does a nice job of offering up potential solutions, or at least a shared frustration, surrounding these topics. I'm going to keep this book in my back pocket and pull it out now and again for a crash course/refresher at the beginning of each year -- if for no other reason than to clear my head and refocus on what's important as an educator.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    I picked this book up because I wanted to learn about the conundrums and difficulties of teaching from the inside, which graphic novels are often quite good at expressing. I felt that this book taught me nothing that I didn't already know or could idealize on my own though. Kids are people too. Labels shouldn't replace looking at the whole child. Perceived weaknesses are often strengths in a different environment. Et cetera. It's all true, but it could all be said in less space, perhaps leaving I picked this book up because I wanted to learn about the conundrums and difficulties of teaching from the inside, which graphic novels are often quite good at expressing. I felt that this book taught me nothing that I didn't already know or could idealize on my own though. Kids are people too. Labels shouldn't replace looking at the whole child. Perceived weaknesses are often strengths in a different environment. Et cetera. It's all true, but it could all be said in less space, perhaps leaving room for the dilemma of teachers being both admired by society while being crucified by parents and the media for not doing enough. Too much burden is put on teachers. They are a single leg in a three-legged chair, the other supports being the kid and the parents themselves. It's easy to say, "This is how it should be." I was more interested in learning why it isn't that way, why that's easier said than done, and the unfiltered version of what it's really like. Education is a complex issue and I wanted to hear it from the trenches, not from the top of the mountain.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This is such a great book. Ayers takes many of the key passages from the original and reimagines them as graphic stories about real teachers and students facing the tough questions in schools (What's worth knowing and doing?). This books stands for everything that learning could be (i.e., inquiry based, student centered, interest driven), if education leaders and union leadership had the courage to demand that we support and provide for students and teachers in every community. The truth is that This is such a great book. Ayers takes many of the key passages from the original and reimagines them as graphic stories about real teachers and students facing the tough questions in schools (What's worth knowing and doing?). This books stands for everything that learning could be (i.e., inquiry based, student centered, interest driven), if education leaders and union leadership had the courage to demand that we support and provide for students and teachers in every community. The truth is that the ideas in this book are hardly new and that elite schools serving the most privileged have for a long time and will continue to support the teaching and learning models described in this great book. Why not give every child this type of education?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Manda Keeton

    William 'Bill' Ayers shares his teaching philosophy in a comic book format, both elevating excellent educators in the field and critiquing the system of education. Ayers champions a social justice based curriculum as well as a nontraditional approach by decrying the use of standardized tests and advocating for more authentic, project-based learning experiences. Though Ayers makes an interesting argument, I wonder who his target audience is. Both educators and preservice teachers will likely be f William 'Bill' Ayers shares his teaching philosophy in a comic book format, both elevating excellent educators in the field and critiquing the system of education. Ayers champions a social justice based curriculum as well as a nontraditional approach by decrying the use of standardized tests and advocating for more authentic, project-based learning experiences. Though Ayers makes an interesting argument, I wonder who his target audience is. Both educators and preservice teachers will likely be familiar with his pedagogical stance, and if they are not, likely won't be moved by his prescriptive tone. Still, this book presents familiar philosophy in an accessible, alternative format.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    To Teach the journey, in comics is a radical vision of teaching as a journey toward a better world and teachers as fellow travelers on an adventure of discovery alongside their students. The author uses stories of creative and nurturing ways he engaged his kindergarteners and profiles of other empowering and inspiring teachers to illustrate his core values of love, seeing students as people, compassion and building relationships and a sense of community in the classroom and the world. I think presenti To Teach the journey, in comics is a radical vision of teaching as a journey toward a better world and teachers as fellow travelers on an adventure of discovery alongside their students. The author uses stories of creative and nurturing ways he engaged his kindergarteners and profiles of other empowering and inspiring teachers to illustrate his core values of love, seeing students as people, compassion and building relationships and a sense of community in the classroom and the world. I think presenting William Ayer’s original traditional book as a graphic novel was a brilliant idea, as the format focused on the most important concepts and the pictures kept me engaged. While I think Ayer’s vision may not always be possible, it is a beautiful ideal to work towards and reading this book inspired me to meet his challenge to be the best teachers we can imagine being. I recommend this book to all educators and anyone who wants to understand what it’s really like to be a teacher and how transformative education can be. Thank you Peter for a wonderful Christmas gift.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Malbadeen

    A few pages into this I thought I was going to be in for an eye rolling walk done cynicism lane but I have to admit that I mostly agreed with the author. On the surface it seems a little hipppy-dippy but at end of the day, I think it mostly does a good job of capturing some of the frustrations and challenges of teaching in the aftermath of Bush's NCLB without going so far overboard that it digresses into an intelligible rant like so many other anti-NCLB can easily do. Some of the pane A few pages into this I thought I was going to be in for an eye rolling walk done cynicism lane but I have to admit that I mostly agreed with the author. On the surface it seems a little hipppy-dippy but at end of the day, I think it mostly does a good job of capturing some of the frustrations and challenges of teaching in the aftermath of Bush's NCLB without going so far overboard that it digresses into an intelligible rant like so many other anti-NCLB can easily do. Some of the panels I especially agreed with are as follows: "To name oneself as a teacher is to live with one foot in the muck of the world as we find it- with its conventional patterns and received wisdom - and the other foot striding toward a world that could be but isn't yet." "Learning stuff is the easy part, and yet that's all our schools obsess about. Thinking is tough,... and that's what I'm interested in." "The struggle is not to stockpile ideas, but to find the core values that define classroom life"

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Radical and philosophical are two words I'd use to describe To Teach by William Ayers and Ryan Alexander-Tanner. It will make you question every tradition, rule, and classroom procedure we foist upon children in the name of education and discipline. In this book, Ayers attempts to squash the notion of the mythical heroic teacher "saving" his students from their lives, but in a somewhat contradictory fashion, this book is also a kind of hero's journey in its own right, as the teacher s Radical and philosophical are two words I'd use to describe To Teach by William Ayers and Ryan Alexander-Tanner. It will make you question every tradition, rule, and classroom procedure we foist upon children in the name of education and discipline. In this book, Ayers attempts to squash the notion of the mythical heroic teacher "saving" his students from their lives, but in a somewhat contradictory fashion, this book is also a kind of hero's journey in its own right, as the teacher sets out on a quest with her students and returns transformed. Read my entire review on my blog.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I've never groaned so much at a comic. Incredibly self-satisfied, pedantic, and generally plain old annoying. I'm on the side of progressive teaching for social justice etc. but just ugh. The format made the message incredibly irritating. Never should have been put in comic form.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I really appreciated an alternate format to talk about teaching, and that one of my professors selected this book for their course. But I can't really say that I learned anything that I didn't already know, thus the three stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Molly Klodor

    I loved reading this book as it was a nice break from the traditional text books. While I can't agree with his argument completely, I respect the work and value Ayers' opinions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Exavidreader

    Definitely a fresh way of getting the message across about how we're not alone in thinking the system really is flawed and we're not alone in our efforts to fight the system in subversive ways for the sake of our children. And if we ever feel it's just not worth the fight, we should persevere because one day our children will thank us. A definite must have for all teachers, and the bonus is that it's a well-written, well-drawn, humorous book where pictures cover the pages more than the words.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Candance Doerr-Stevens

    This was an inspirational read. I can see myself coming back to this again and again as a text to help me gauge my inner compass, a reminder of why I do what I do. This is a great gift book for a teacher friend. Favorite quote: “Good schools are places where students come to believe in their own capacity to change the world,” (p. 101)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ingrid

    Got about halfway through before calling it quits. I was expecting it to be about what it's like to be a teacher, when really it's more of an illustrated telling of this guy's personal teaching philosophy. While I agree with a lot of what he's saying, it doesn't make for an interesting read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brynn

    This is a phenomenal read for future teachers or teachers who want to challenge what they know about teaching and change the course of their students and classroom for the better. This text was incredible and I learned so many things to take with me into my own classroom.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This book does a great job capturing the magic of K-12 classroom teaching.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Random Scholar

    This graphic novel (geared for adults) provided a philosophical overview of what it means to be a teacher today. Although the illustrations were fun and engaging, this book was just okay for me. I studied famous education theorists before reading this book, and I found many elements of John Dewey in the writing of this book. Many of the ideas were not new. For example, one idea that kept getting raised was that education should be relevant to students lives. This is not a new idea, and we have s This graphic novel (geared for adults) provided a philosophical overview of what it means to be a teacher today. Although the illustrations were fun and engaging, this book was just okay for me. I studied famous education theorists before reading this book, and I found many elements of John Dewey in the writing of this book. Many of the ideas were not new. For example, one idea that kept getting raised was that education should be relevant to students lives. This is not a new idea, and we have seen numerous progressive reforms fail in the past because there was too much emphasis on making education relevant to students lives and not enough on promoting common core knowledge that students need to know in order to be successful in today's economy. School is not always going to be fireworks and candy. There will be some information that students need to learn to literally help them get decent paying jobs (like how to read contracts, write resumes and cover letters). This will not always be fun, yet this book seemed to emphasize fun activities over anything else. What the author failed to mention was that schools have tried this in the past and unless the students already came from a privileged, educated family, they did not learn anything by just playing games all day at school. I also didn't agree with the portrayal of assessment in this book. The two executives who were asking about student test scores were portrayed in a very negative manner, and this did not paint a realistic picture of what assessment really is. If the assessment is done correctly, it can provide accurate and timely information on what students already know and what they still need help with.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Belynda Weber

    A fun way to learn different teaching strategies.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Smidl

    Some good points about the practice of teaching and that good teachers never know everything. We continue to educate ourselves to educate others. Learning continues to evolve as we do.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    Excellent book on how teachers can wield creative lessons. Ayers uses himself as an example of a teacher being creative through the restraints of stifling standardized education.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Glynn

    Sweet, simple, made me cry and encouraged me to finally enroll for my master's in education which starts this summer.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Thanh Do

    Read for a class

  23. 4 out of 5

    AnnieOhh624

    One of the easiest textbooks I've read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristina King

    OMG WEATHERMEN BILL AYERS MOONMEN OBAMA! William Ayers became a national name during the 2008 presidential campaign, where it was revealed he taught Barack Obama how to build bombs. Young Obama was just eight years old when he went on missions with the Weather Underground Organization, a revolutionary group hellbent on destroying Freedom. While Ayers was never convicted of any crime, his name is forever synonymous with violent radicals. As a Chicago resident (and Obama campaign donor), his de OMG WEATHERMEN BILL AYERS MOONMEN OBAMA! William Ayers became a national name during the 2008 presidential campaign, where it was revealed he taught Barack Obama how to build bombs. Young Obama was just eight years old when he went on missions with the Weather Underground Organization, a revolutionary group hellbent on destroying Freedom. While Ayers was never convicted of any crime, his name is forever synonymous with violent radicals. As a Chicago resident (and Obama campaign donor), his decades-old activities became linked with our current President. So? I picked up To Teach: a journey, in comics after reading about it on boingboing. Of course I'd heard Ayers' name before, but mostly as a pejorative. I knew I'd never get around to reading the extended cut of this book, the non-graphic To Teach: A Journey . Although I teach, I'm not one for other teachers' memoirs. There's just too many damn books in this world for me to catch up with. But the journey, in comics, looked brief enough to sneak in while reading something else. Plus, as its title indicates, it is illustrated. And fittingly whimsically, at that. This book shows the wonder of young children (and Ayers!) learning; it is fitting the illustrations are sparkling and vibrant. The journey, in comics, was a quick little read, but that's not to say it lacks substance. It reminds you that students are people. It reminds you to consider where they are a coming from. It has many heartwarming moments, and many "Hey, Bill, way to eff the system!" moments. If you find yourself dissatisfied with the bureaucracy of the educational system, you'll find yourself agreeing with the message in the book. If you aren't satisfied with public education because you believe it needs teacher pay based on standardized test results, screw you. And definitely don't read this book. So how do you apply all of the lofty nuggets in this book? I don't know. (If you're looking for that answer in a book, I suppose you'll have to read longer works, complete with chapters of footnotes, to figure that out.) But I really enjoyed this book, for it was brief yet substantive and heartfelt. It reminded me why I've always wanted to be a teacher. (Even though I've had my moments—and year-long job—of doubts, I think back to various "letters to myself" where I wrote I wanted to be a teacher [or graphic designer, or newscaster, but that's beside the point. Teaching has been consistent!].) It's because of things like this (44): I want to build spaces where each person is visible to me and to everyone else—and, most importantly, to themselves. Students should sense their own unique power and potential. In this classroom, each is known and understood, recognized and valued... I want to build spaces where the insistently social nature of learning is honored, where knowledge and power are shared and not hoarded. Knowledge, like love, is something you can give away without losing a thing. If you teach, have taught, or consider doing so, I recommend you read this. It reminds me that I'm on a life-long journey as a teacher, and it is okay for me to be questioning my path. Complacency doesn't work in this profession. If you think it does, you shouldn't teach. KK P.S. Dhalgren is still up next; I just read the last chapter of this lil' book after reading it on-and-off for a few weeks.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    Just the right read to lift my spirits as a teacher. This book was so fun to read and thought provoking as well. It brought me to center to remind me of the idealism and principals that drew me to the profession but with a realism to the obstacles and experience that honors the profession as well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I really, really, really like this book. It's like a heart-felt love-letter to teachers. And it's a great distillation (with pictures!) of what I believe education SHOULD be about and the things I continue to strive to embody in my own teaching. Ayers (and by consequence Alexander-Tanner's artwork) focus on the importance of seeing the individuality of students and knowing that teachers and learners build knowledge together; the importance of creating physical spaces that honor, inspire, and sup I really, really, really like this book. It's like a heart-felt love-letter to teachers. And it's a great distillation (with pictures!) of what I believe education SHOULD be about and the things I continue to strive to embody in my own teaching. Ayers (and by consequence Alexander-Tanner's artwork) focus on the importance of seeing the individuality of students and knowing that teachers and learners build knowledge together; the importance of creating physical spaces that honor, inspire, and support rich, quality learning; the immensely vital need to link learning with students' lives, of building on previous knowledge and experience as foundations for deeper learning; the power of engaging a living, breathing (rather than a stagnant, unresponsive) curriculum; and the importance of authentic assessment as a tool for informing and supporting continued learning. LOVE IT! Now, I'm probably a bit biased. First, I've met Bill Ayers several times at conferences, talks, and educator gatherings. He's a really cool dude, but more importantly a really reflective, dedicated educator. Plus, he started out teaching Kindergarten, so his reflections and Alexander-Tanner's illustrations of that time in his career really connect with me. I have found it rare for educational theorists/practitioners to have a strong connection with early childhood settings; they often ignore the powerful and insightful voices of little people. But not Ayers. Also, lots of the references in the book -- people and places in particular -- are really familiar to me. Having lived in Chicago, I go, "Oh, that's the Field!" (pg 97) or "You are SO right about standardized test questions. Do kids in Iowa even know what the projects are?!" (pg 86) And I know some of the educators Ayers uses as examples in the book. (I've met Dave Stovall several times and a friend did research with him at Social Justice High School -- one of the small schools that is a part of the Lawndale Little Village High School, a Chicago public school.) So, when I read this text I see pieces of my own story, pieces of a city I've called home and its history, and reflections of educators I know who are hard at work trying to make education what it should be for all learners. To Teach: The Journey, in Comics is a great read and such an amazing way to introduce, reintroduce, or remind those thoughtful about education about some of the most important issues at its core. It makes me want to go pick up and read the original text -- To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher -- which I just might do!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    To say this book has been a mind expanding read, is not nearly close enough to the truth. This is a book that should be included on reading lists for all students in teacher colleges. I don't imagine it will be though, because so much of what Bill Ayers expounds is not in line with the way the government wants teachers to teach. His philosophy which comes across so well in both the drawings and the text is one of inquiry. Drawing inspiration from a diverse range of people including th To say this book has been a mind expanding read, is not nearly close enough to the truth. This is a book that should be included on reading lists for all students in teacher colleges. I don't imagine it will be though, because so much of what Bill Ayers expounds is not in line with the way the government wants teachers to teach. His philosophy which comes across so well in both the drawings and the text is one of inquiry. Drawing inspiration from a diverse range of people including the famous director Stanislavsky, he shares his ideas of how to be a better teacher. Seeing himself as not just a teacher, but a student as well, sharing in the journey of learning, Bill Ayers opens up the traditional role of teacher. He looks at students as individual people, trying to see all of who they are and none passing judgement. He understands the importance of the teaching/learning environment, and the need for constant reflection and renewal. This is a book administrators should read as well, so they can better support the teachers within their schools as they strive to teach all the students. This is a book that bureaucrats in the Departments of Education should read so they can have a better understanding of what teachers should be trying to do. I will return to this book, and read it through many many times as I try to take some of these ideas and apply them to my own classroom. OK, second time around, and there are still so many things to ponder. The valedictorian address given by Quinn, at the end of the book, is filled with wonderful ideas. I love this one: " Given what we know now, what are we going to do about it?" This question is so profound, and I want to ask it of my students. Not once, but many times over and over again to get it into their heads, that learning has a practical side to it, and they should strive to learn things because they can use that knowledge to do something or create something.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I saw this in the graphic novels section of my local library and picked it up -- I'm planning to acquire my own copy so I can re-read it every year or so. For me, this book is the bird's-eye complement to, Teach Like a Champion Summary, which I love (2.0 is out, but I've only read the original). Where Teach Like a Champion Summary is the nuts and bolts, technical side of teaching, To Teach: The Journey, in Comics is the ethical guide for how to use those skills. It also presents a more human view of educa I saw this in the graphic novels section of my local library and picked it up -- I'm planning to acquire my own copy so I can re-read it every year or so. For me, this book is the bird's-eye complement to, Teach Like a Champion Summary, which I love (2.0 is out, but I've only read the original). Where Teach Like a Champion Summary is the nuts and bolts, technical side of teaching, To Teach: The Journey, in Comics is the ethical guide for how to use those skills. It also presents a more human view of education than I often see, and manages to be critical of curricular standards without demonizing them. This is a short book, and where TLaC is unswervingly practical, To Teach is more high-level and philosophical, more a set of guiding principals than an applicable formula. It's apparently a companion volume to To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher, 3rd Edition, which I'm now extremely interested in reading. I strongly recommend it to current teachers, prospective teachers, and anyone interested in a look at some of the internal and external struggles educators face.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    What is the ultimate goal of an educator? Is it to prepare students for standardized tests, leveled groups, and administrative requirement? Is it to provide a welcome environment for open thought and experimentation? What are our internal questions regarding education, and how can we answer them through real world application? These are some of the questions William Ayers tackles in this graphic novel. A veteran teacher, Ayers uses anecdotal bits to highlight ways in which he himself What is the ultimate goal of an educator? Is it to prepare students for standardized tests, leveled groups, and administrative requirement? Is it to provide a welcome environment for open thought and experimentation? What are our internal questions regarding education, and how can we answer them through real world application? These are some of the questions William Ayers tackles in this graphic novel. A veteran teacher, Ayers uses anecdotal bits to highlight ways in which he himself has faced, and in some cases fought for, these ideals and also those teachers or community members who have also changed the way that learning is broached. Examples include his own classrooms, those of his children, former students, and groundbreaking teachers throughout the country. Topics go from the very abstract, "Is Productive Work Going On?", to the practical, "How can I design my classroom for productive learning?" Ayers has clear issues with the imposition of administration and standardized testing on the uniqueness and ability levels of children and teachers, but he does make it clear that he understands some of the reasoning, but wishes for more opportunity to reevaluate the methods. Fans of Waiting for Superman, or other education reform pieces may like this short and sweet entry. The graphic format lends itself to the observations teachers make, the nuances of young children and teens, as well as the bits of humor found in everyday teaching.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    This book should be required reading for students in schools of education. Ayers delivers a series of crucial ideas about the craft and art of teaching in a way that is engaging and very accessible. He shows us what it truly takes to be a teacher (no, it is not technique. There are plenty of teachers who can do good lessons plans and manage a classroom only to be proven bad teachers). The narrative not only deals with Bill's story, but he also introduces us to his kindergarten class as well as o This book should be required reading for students in schools of education. Ayers delivers a series of crucial ideas about the craft and art of teaching in a way that is engaging and very accessible. He shows us what it truly takes to be a teacher (no, it is not technique. There are plenty of teachers who can do good lessons plans and manage a classroom only to be proven bad teachers). The narrative not only deals with Bill's story, but he also introduces us to his kindergarten class as well as other teachers and the work they do. The book is warm and moving at times, and it is very inspiring. In between the narrative, we also get lessons on teaching philosophy and pedagogy, but again, it is very accessible. The simple style of the art complements the story very well. It brings the story to life and makes it a bit more entertaining. I will say that I have read a good number of books about teachers; I am a former teacher now librarian, and I can say with confidence that a lot of those other books were a waste of time. This one is one that I wish I could put in the hands of every student teacher. In fact, this is a book that a lot of parents need to read in order to understand the work that the teachers do in educating their children. Maybe then those parents will have a better appreciation of the challenges and obstacles teachers face (starting with the terrible construct that is standardized testing).

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