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Fairy Tale Comics: Classic Tales Told by Extraordinary Cartoonists

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From favorites like "Puss in Boots" and "Goldilocks" to obscure gems like "The Boy Who Drew Cats," Fairy Tale Comics has something to offer every reader. Seventeen fairy tales are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by seventeen different cartoonists, including Raina Telgemeier, Brett Helquist, Cherise Harper, and more. Edited by Nursery Rhyme Comics' Chris From favorites like "Puss in Boots" and "Goldilocks" to obscure gems like "The Boy Who Drew Cats," Fairy Tale Comics has something to offer every reader. Seventeen fairy tales are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by seventeen different cartoonists, including Raina Telgemeier, Brett Helquist, Cherise Harper, and more.   Edited by Nursery Rhyme Comics' Chris Duffy, this jacketed hardcover is a beautiful gift and an instant classic.


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From favorites like "Puss in Boots" and "Goldilocks" to obscure gems like "The Boy Who Drew Cats," Fairy Tale Comics has something to offer every reader. Seventeen fairy tales are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by seventeen different cartoonists, including Raina Telgemeier, Brett Helquist, Cherise Harper, and more. Edited by Nursery Rhyme Comics' Chris From favorites like "Puss in Boots" and "Goldilocks" to obscure gems like "The Boy Who Drew Cats," Fairy Tale Comics has something to offer every reader. Seventeen fairy tales are wonderfully adapted and illustrated in comics format by seventeen different cartoonists, including Raina Telgemeier, Brett Helquist, Cherise Harper, and more.   Edited by Nursery Rhyme Comics' Chris Duffy, this jacketed hardcover is a beautiful gift and an instant classic.

30 review for Fairy Tale Comics: Classic Tales Told by Extraordinary Cartoonists

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    Quick telling of fairy tales in graphic novel form. The art was interesting and colorful. They chose some unusual tales and ones everyone knows. I liked the artwork. I enjoyed: The Boy who Drew Cats - funny, Baba Yaga, Give me the Shudders and 12 Dancing Princesses. They were unknown to me and I enjoyed new tales. I also appreciated Hansel and Gretel, Puss in Boots, Rapunzel, Rumpelstiltskin and Snow White. It's good to read these classics as a graphic novel. Fun Times.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steph Sinclair

    I loved this book and the different spin the cartoonists put on these old stories I grew up on. The artwork is different for every story (17 in total) and some of them are really funny. Here were a few of my favorites:

  3. 4 out of 5

    Liviania

    I was a little disappointed in this comic anthology until I read the afterword. FAIRY TALE COMICS achieves what it sets out to do: illustrate the big tales and only a few obscure ones. FAIRY TALE COMICS is truly a collection for children, who aren't so familiar with the tales or expecting of subversion. Editor Chris Duffy lined up a fantastic group of creators. I fell in love with Luke Pearson's work after reading HILDA AND THE MIDNIGHT GIANT for the Cybils last year, and his "The Boy Who Drew I was a little disappointed in this comic anthology until I read the afterword. FAIRY TALE COMICS achieves what it sets out to do: illustrate the big tales and only a few obscure ones. FAIRY TALE COMICS is truly a collection for children, who aren't so familiar with the tales or expecting of subversion. Editor Chris Duffy lined up a fantastic group of creators. I fell in love with Luke Pearson's work after reading HILDA AND THE MIDNIGHT GIANT for the Cybils last year, and his "The Boy Who Drew Cats" (based on a Japanese tale) is a true standout. It is super cute, and the little boy in it is such a little boy. Raina Telgemeier's "Rapunzel" deviates the most from the popular tale, I believe, and the way she ends it is quite clever. Because most of the stories in FAIRY TALE COMICS are straightforward retellings, the quality of the art is very important. And the art is superb. Brett Helquist's art will be familiar to fans of popular children's books like A Series of Unfortunate Events. Other artists like Gilbert Hernandez and Craig Thompson are ones to grow on, creators young readers can seek out when they're older. There's a wide range of colors palettes, mediums, and styles on display. It keeps the anthology feeling fresh to the end. I highly recommend FAIRY TALE COMICS for those seeking a fun book that will appeal to a young reader. Adult fans of folklore might not be as enthused, although the art is quite enjoyable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Editor Chris Duffy chose the fairy tales to be included in this book by trying to have a mix of well-known tales, some non-European stories, and a mix of male and female protagonists. Each tale is illustrated by a different artist, each in their own style. Some of the things I really enjoyed were the female lumberjack in Little Red Riding Hood, the headdress on Snow White's evil stepmother that looked like horns on her head, the wordless version of Goldilocks, and the Bremen Town musicians on Editor Chris Duffy chose the fairy tales to be included in this book by trying to have a mix of well-known tales, some non-European stories, and a mix of male and female protagonists. Each tale is illustrated by a different artist, each in their own style. Some of the things I really enjoyed were the female lumberjack in Little Red Riding Hood, the headdress on Snow White's evil stepmother that looked like horns on her head, the wordless version of Goldilocks, and the Bremen Town musicians on stage as a rock band at the end of their story. A few of the artists are familiar from books already in my library. Brett Helquist is the illustrator of the Series of Unfortunate Events and was responsible for Rumpelstiltskin in this anthology. Raina Telgemeier is the creator of the graphic novel Smile. Her version of Rapunzel is more like the movie "Tangled". The girl saves the prince and they leave the witch stuck in the tower. I also appreciated that the Editor's Note included a list of books and websites where you can find more tales like these. I would recommend this to any reader who likes fairy tales, either the traditional versions, or more modernized retellings. I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Not as much fun as its companion Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists, which makes sense. nursery rhymes being more enigmatic and so more conducive to playful reinterpretations. Most of the stories drawn here are told straight, which can be good if your children, like mine, could use a basic fairy tale literacy boost. My favorite was "The Boy Who Drew Cats" by Luke Pearson.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dov Zeller

    This was a really fun anthology. From "Sweet Porridge" by Bobby London to "Azzolino's Story Without End" (a great place to end). I found the whole thing a delight. And I'm excited to have been introduced to Gigi D.G. and her online comic Cucumber Quest (which I'm about to check out.)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    When I was in elementary school, I distinctly remember how popular Jon Scieszka’s The Stinky Cheese Man: And Other Fairly Stupid Tales was. Managing to get a hold of it at the school library was pretty much impossible, because everyone wanted to read it. I can easily imagine Fairy Tale Comics being similarly popular with the intended audience. The stories are light-hearted and funny, though with just enough of the cruelty of the original tales to delight kids, because, let’s be honest, children When I was in elementary school, I distinctly remember how popular Jon Scieszka’s The Stinky Cheese Man: And Other Fairly Stupid Tales was. Managing to get a hold of it at the school library was pretty much impossible, because everyone wanted to read it. I can easily imagine Fairy Tale Comics being similarly popular with the intended audience. The stories are light-hearted and funny, though with just enough of the cruelty of the original tales to delight kids, because, let’s be honest, children do tend to like watching people get hurt. Most of the stories featured in Fairy Tale Comics were familiar to me and will be to other adult readers as well, being the most popular of the Grimms’ tales. However, Duffy also included a handful of tales from other sources, ones I’ve never encountered myself. This blend of the familiar and the new will be enchanting for kids and parents alike. Younger readers enjoy familiarity, and it helps make reading a bit easier if you know the story already. In fact, Duffy clearly had this in mind when he put the anthology together, because the first five stories are all Grimms’ tales, allowing the reader to get comfortable before springing something that might be new. In most anthologies, there tend to be a few real clunkers, but all of the stories in Fairy Tale Comics were really fun reads. Sure, I had my personal favorites, but none of them were horribly boring or with artwork so annoying I couldn’t deal. The stories I enjoyed the most were “The Prince and the Tortoise” by Ramona Fradon and Chris Duffy, “Rapunzel” by Raina Telgemeier, and “Give Me the Shudders” by David Mazzuchelli. Two of them were entirely new to me, and Rapunzel had a nice twist to the ending that I rather enjoyed. As is the case in “Rapunzel,” several of the tales feature clever little changes. These obviously will not stand out to those who are not well-versed in the tales, but I picked up on a few and they were all great improvements. Obviously much of the gore has been cut, but there are intentional revisions, most of which increase the role of the female characters in the fairy tales. In “Puss in Boots,” the reader learns right at the end that Puss is in fact a female cat. Similarly, the lumberjack in “Little Red Riding Hood” is a woman, rather than a man. These are small changes, but they’re excellently done, adding agency and strength to female characters. Fairy Tale Comics will be enjoyed by both parents and children, or adults like me who do not get tired of clever retellings of fairy tales. Each tale is humorous and quick for younger readers, but with subtle jokes to delight maturer readers. A great readalike for Jon Scieszka’s fairy tale retellings or fractured fairy tales, like those included in Rocky & Bullwinkle.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashly Lynn

    3.5 Stars This is a collection of fairy tales that many of us are already familiar with illustrated and written by some wonderful comic artists. This is a collection of 18 wonderful stories. I thoroughly enjoyed reading these comics: however, I wasn’t floored by them. To me, this collection was just good. Not great, not excellent, but good. These were very fun to read, but I’m glad I didn’t spend money on the collection. I was pleasantly surprised to find a story by each Craig Thompson and Emily 3.5 Stars This is a collection of fairy tales that many of us are already familiar with illustrated and written by some wonderful comic artists. This is a collection of 18 wonderful stories. I thoroughly enjoyed reading these comics: however, I wasn’t floored by them. To me, this collection was just good. Not great, not excellent, but good. These were very fun to read, but I’m glad I didn’t spend money on the collection. I was pleasantly surprised to find a story by each Craig Thompson and Emily Carroll, as I’ve enjoyed other works by them. Their stories were both lovely, and I’m glad these authors were included. My favorite story from this collection is “The Boy Who Liked to Draw Cats.” This was such a fun, cute story and one of the only few I didn’t recognize. I liked it because it was fresh and new and so interesting and also downright adorable. I did appreciate almost all the artwork in this collection. I love seeing fairy tales come to life in picture and these cartoonists did just that. They brought these stories to life and made them fresh and enjoyable to read. This has been a really short review, but I don’t have much more to say about this collection. Overall, I totally recommend this if you’re looking for a light, fun, and quick read or if you love comic strips/cartoon comics. You can never go wrong with fairy tales. Review originally published on my Wordpress blog Dreaming Through Literature.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    What an entertaining read! I love when authors/editors put a new spin on an old tale and this book features seventeen traditional stories. I think graphic novels like this one are great for introducing readers to a new format with a familiar story. I had only encountered one of the cartoonists before checking out this book (Raina Telgemeier, who is awesome!), but I found several new favorites! Gilbert Hernández's Hansel and Gretel was so adorably abrupt with the witch's demeanor that I actually What an entertaining read! I love when authors/editors put a new spin on an old tale and this book features seventeen traditional stories. I think graphic novels like this one are great for introducing readers to a new format with a familiar story. I had only encountered one of the cartoonists before checking out this book (Raina Telgemeier, who is awesome!), but I found several new favorites! Gilbert Hernández's Hansel and Gretel was so adorably abrupt with the witch's demeanor that I actually laughed out loud! My absolute favorite, though, was Vanessa Davis's Puss in Boots which is the funniest retelling of a fairy tale I have ever read! The first four frames will make you laugh out loud, guaranteed. It gets better the more you read with a very clever cat, the hilariously named Lord Pistachio, and a very clean, well-crafted ending. This one was lots of fun!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    • I thought it did a great job fracturing some of the fairy tales. I was however disappointed that I didn’t recognize as many of the short stories as I was hoping. Out of the 17 stories, I only knew 6 of them. This makes it hard to compare the tales with the originals if you have never read them. Even though these are fairy tales, the graphics are somewhat freighting which make it hard to use with first grade. • Writing with focus on fractured fairy tales, grades 1-7 • (2013, Sept 1). School • I thought it did a great job fracturing some of the fairy tales. I was however disappointed that I didn’t recognize as many of the short stories as I was hoping. Out of the 17 stories, I only knew 6 of them. This makes it hard to compare the tales with the originals if you have never read them. Even though these are fairy tales, the graphics are somewhat freighting which make it hard to use with first grade. • Writing with focus on fractured fairy tales, grades 1-7 • (2013, Sept 1). School library Journal http://www.booksinprint.com/DetailedV...#

  11. 5 out of 5

    paula

    I swear, the artists Chris Duffy gets for these anthologies do their very best work for him. People who do serious, sometimes hard to read long-form work like Habibi (Charles Thompson), Skim (Jillian Tamaki), and Asterios Polyp (Dave Mazzuchelli) let loose with all the humor and charm that they sometimes withhold from their main work. On the other hand, artists like Charise Mericle Harper and Raina, who are almost always fun and charming, add a little smidge of arch and sass to their pieces in I swear, the artists Chris Duffy gets for these anthologies do their very best work for him. People who do serious, sometimes hard to read long-form work like Habibi (Charles Thompson), Skim (Jillian Tamaki), and Asterios Polyp (Dave Mazzuchelli) let loose with all the humor and charm that they sometimes withhold from their main work. On the other hand, artists like Charise Mericle Harper and Raina, who are almost always fun and charming, add a little smidge of arch and sass to their pieces in this stellar collection.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mayda

    This collection classic fairy tales offers a mix of well-known and lesser known tales. From the Brothers Grimm tales to Charles Perrault’s Puss in Boots to the 1001 Nights , this wonderful compilation varies in style and kind. Included are folklore tales from Europe, Russia, Japan, and America. Also included is a list books and websites for further exploration into the realm of fairy tales. This assortment of tales makes for a fun and interesting read for anyone who appreciates make-believe.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    A fabulous collection of classic fairytales graphically revisited. Each is a unique retelling of an original with fabulously different illustrations to match. I enjoyed some more than others, but as a whole it is a wonderful collection.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miss Lasko-Gross

    Excellent! A very well curated collection,not a turkey among the cartoonists chosen.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eti

    Fairy tales are part of our DNA. They tell us we can be brave; great evil can be defeated; and sometimes things work out in unexpected ways. They are the stories we tell – and retell – in every generation. From campfire storytelling to bards to Disney, fairy tales have shifted in response to time and circumstance, becoming the stories that need to be told - or retold. Oral storytelling is intricately linked with tradition of using images to tell stories, whether through cave drawings, Fairy tales are part of our DNA. They tell us we can be brave; great evil can be defeated; and sometimes things work out in unexpected ways. They are the stories we tell – and retell – in every generation. From campfire storytelling to bards to Disney, fairy tales have shifted in response to time and circumstance, becoming the stories that need to be told - or retold. Oral storytelling is intricately linked with tradition of using images to tell stories, whether through cave drawings, tapestries, or picture books. And when you combine fairy tales with visual storytelling, you get magic. A new understanding of the tales emerges by playing with form and medium. Fairy Tale Comics is the result of the natural partnership between story and form. In this follow up to the widely successful Nursery Rhyme Comics, editor Chris Duffy delves deeper in the possibilities of retelling classic stories by putting them in the hands of talented and innovative artists. (You can see a full list of contributors here.) The incredible range of both stories and artists breathes new life in these stories of old. Ramona Fradon and Chris Duffy’s “The Prince and the Tortoise” plays homage to the Classic Illustrated-style that feels reminiscent of Prince Valiant and other epics. Brett Helquist’s “Rumpelstiltskin” is set in the traditional fairy tale world, with a distinct Brett Helquist style. I absolutely loved his portrayal of the dastardly villain Rumpelstiltskin. And this is his first comic ever! Bobby London’s “Sweet Porridge” is a madcap adventure full of pratfalls and subtle humor like the best Sunday cartoon. Raina Telgemeier’s version of "Rapunzel" puts a delightful new spin on the “damsel in distress” trope. Her Rapunzel is no shrinking violet, but a fierce and brave heroine, who (spoiler alert) saves herself. I loved Emily Carroll’s version of “The 12 Dancing Princesses,” one of my favorite childhood stories thanks to Shelly Duvall’s Fairy Tale Theatre. Carroll fleshes out the character of the young hero by showing an interaction with him and an old woman, who gifts him with his invisibility cloak for his kindness. Unlike the original story where a princess is given to him in marriage as a reward for saving them, in Carroll’s version, the youngest princess chooses him. The range of artists and stories guarantees that readers will find stories that they connect with, whether they are in the mood for a humorous, scary, or magical story. Fairy Tale Comics is truly kids’ comics at its best. When I read this collection, my mind spun with ways that it could be used in a classroom or a library. I’ve shared my list of ideas below for using Fairy Tale Comics. Feel free to share your ideas in the comments. I’d love to know how people are using this amazing collection in the wild. Reader’s Theater It was perfect timing when I received a copy of Fairy Tale Comics from Netgalley as I was preparing my unit about drama. I taught Oral Interpretation of Literature class this past spring at the college and sought out moments to use comics to teach visual storytelling. These comics were perfect for teaching about reader’s theater, which included setting, characterization, tone, pitch, and more. I gave my students scripts that I created from the text of the comics. I used "Sweet Porridge!" by Bobby London, "Rumpelstiltskin" by Brett Helquist, "Rapunzel" by Raina Telgemeier, "The 12 Dancing Princesses" by Emily Carroll. I gave my students 15-20 minutes to prepare their story with some basic props, but how they preformed it was up to them. I then projected the stories on a screen beside the performers. I could see how the visual medium affected their dramatic interpretation – and the audience’s interaction with it. Drama itself is very visual so this seemed like a perfect pairing. Using these stories added dimension to their performances and engaged my students in new ways. Graphic novelists often use reader’s theater to share their work, so it’s wonderful when we can use it to celebrate them. Get your Aarne-Thompson on! Until I took a storytelling class at GSLIS with the beyond fabulous Kate McDowell, I had no idea what the Aarne-Thompson classification system was and now it illuminates every fairy tale reading experience. In short, it is an index that organizes folktales according to plot points and motifs. Actually, it’s now called the Aarne-Thompson-Uther classification system so it can continue to expand. The bottom line is that there are different types of tales – from Persecuted Heroine (type 501) to Animals in Exile (type 130) with many variations from around the world. Yes, this is an opportunity for a “Cinderella project” kind of unit, but you can ditch Ella for one of the tales in Fairy Tale Comics. Your students can research variations on the tale and have a chance to return to the world of fairy tale picture books, where some of the best retellings are found. They can compare them with the Fairy Tale Comics version and critically think about the ways stories are told and retold. Retelling: Twisted, Fractured, or Swapped Let your students or patrons retell a fairy tale. Switching perspectives (like in The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka, illustrated by Lane Smith) or changing the gender of a character (like Gigi D. G. did in "Little Red Riding Hood," replacing the male lumberjack for the female one) can help writers think about stories in new ways. Pair this activity with a lesson on the fundamentals of comics creation and design (gutter, panels, bubbles, etc.). They can storyboard the fairy tale and retell it using an app like Comic Life, comic creator from ReadWriteThink, or ToonDoo. (Excellent resources for teaching how to create comics include the classic Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud and 99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style by Matt Madden, thanks to Carol Tilley's excellent comics class.) Make sure it’s clear that anyone can create comics and use his or her own style to tell a story. Many of these fairy tales are based on Grimm tales, which were already interpretations of tales from the oral tradition so we’re already in the habit of shifting and changing stories. Bring in stories by Hans Christian Anderson, Andrew Lang, and other more obscure authors and let your students try retelling them. Spoiler Alert Chris Duffy reported that the next comics collection is going to be Fable Comics. I can't wait to see how the artists take on Aesop, Kipling, or other authors, but in the meantime, this is a great opportunity for your students or patrons to try their hand at their own fable comics. Reader’s Advisory This collection is a natural fit for pairing with the multitudes of fantastic fairy tale picture books found in the 398.2 section of your local public library. This collection is perfect for young people and adults alike, each getting something different out of it. So here are some my favorite fairy tale readalikes for both groups. For young people The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Sciezka, illustrated by Lane Smith The Stinky Cheese Man & Other Fairly Stupid Tales by Jon Sciezka, illustrated by Lane Smith The Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munsch, illustrated by Michael Martchenko Little Lit: Once Upon a Time, Little Lit: Strange Stories for Strange Kids, and Little Lit: It Was a Dark and Silly Night from Toon Books Nursery Rhyme Comics For older young people A Tale Dark and Grimm Series by Adam Gidwitz, illustrated by Hugh D’Andrade The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making Series by Catherynne M. Valente Rapunzel’s Revenge by Shannon and Dean Hale, illustrated by Nathan Hale For young adults and grownups Fables by Bill Willingham Ash by Malinda Lo The Rose and the Beast by Francesca Lia Block Chinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah Birdwing by Rafe Martin Beastly by Alex Flinn A Curse Dark as Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce East by Edith Pattou Wildwood Dancing by Juliet Marillier Princess at the Midnight Ball by Jessica Day George Once Upon a Time television series Second City’s Advice from a Cartoon Princess Series (for grownups) Resources Twice Upon a Time: A Guide to Fractured, Altered, and Retold Folk and Fairy Tales by Catharine R. Bomhold and Terri E. Elder Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales, Children, and the Culture Industry by Jack Zipes Enchanted Hunters: The Power of Stories in Childhood by Maria Tatar Fairy Tale Review Marvels & Tales: Journal of Fairy Tale Studies SurlaLune Fairy Tales Fairy Tales @ Web English Teacher Folktexts: A Library of Folktales, Folklore, Fairy Tales, and Mythology A Mighty Girl's Fairy Tales and Folktales Dave Roman's Reader's Theater Tips

  16. 4 out of 5

    Logan D

    I enjoyed reading this. It included different cartoonists for each tale and each tale originated from different cultures and different parts of the world. These fairy tales had good life lessons and they are very easy to understand. This is a fun and quick read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This is a really fun book that is exactly what the title says it is: multiple fairy tale comics. Some of the comics I enjoyed more than others and I'm sure most of those were because of the art. Favorites are: 12 Dancing Princesses: I was surprised to realize after reading this one that it is by an artist I am already familiar with. I read all of her short online comics a few months back, but didn't make the connection until reading her bio at the back of the book. I really do recommend her comics This is a really fun book that is exactly what the title says it is: multiple fairy tale comics. Some of the comics I enjoyed more than others and I'm sure most of those were because of the art. Favorites are: 12 Dancing Princesses: I was surprised to realize after reading this one that it is by an artist I am already familiar with. I read all of her short online comics a few months back, but didn't make the connection until reading her bio at the back of the book. I really do recommend her comics if you liked her work in this one. They can be found here, but warning she has a definite horror slant in most of them. Little Red Riding Hood: The huntswoman elbows the wolf in the stomach hard enough to send the grandma flying out! There is nothing else I can say about this one; it's just great. (And red riding hood's :D face is adorable.) The Prince and the Tortoise: It is in the classic comic book style art and it looks good. The Boy Who Drew Cats: He just wants to draw cats. I hadn't heard of this fairy tale before so between a positive first impression and good art, I enjoyed it. Rumpelstiltskin: I've liked Brett Helquist's art ever since I first read A Series of Unfortunate Events and I think he did a great job on this comic like he does in all the art I've seen from him. Rapunzel: The art is cute. The ending is different from the original and I like the idea that her and the prince are going to go have adventures hopefully the sort of adventures the Rapunzel in Rapunzel's Revenge had. The Small Tooth: This is another fairy tale I wasn't familiar with until this comic. The fairy tale itself is one where the parent must give away their child for reasons that left me shaking me head why (I think the author was aware of that, so it was kind of humorous the way it is portrayed). The art and overall layout of the comic was charming and I really enjoyed it. Goldilocks and the Three Bears: It is entirely silent which really works because all the necessary information is conveyed through the character's facial expressions and body language. The art is also great and I really like the character design for the three bears; they are super cute. Baba Yaga: I love Baba Yaga and her rooster foot house, so of course I liked this comic and the art. Bremen Town: The final full page frame of them in a band was probably my favorite fun adaption in all of this book. Overall this is a fun adaptation of the fairy tales and even though I don't always like adaptations I'm more willing to forgive it when the changes are fun and accompanied by great art; which they were.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Fairy Tale Comics is a collection of fairy tales, re-imagined (and re-imaged) by various cartoonists- Raina Telgemeier (Smile), Craig Thompson (Blankets), and Brett Helquist (A Series of Unfortunate Events) to name a few. The tales span from Grimm's Fairy Tales to Russian and Japanese folktales to Bre'r Rabbit tales from the South. The variety of illustrations is amazing, each with its own qualities. Some are narrative, some are mainly dialogue, some are wordless. Speaking of dialogue, "Hansel Fairy Tale Comics is a collection of fairy tales, re-imagined (and re-imaged) by various cartoonists- Raina Telgemeier (Smile), Craig Thompson (Blankets), and Brett Helquist (A Series of Unfortunate Events) to name a few. The tales span from Grimm's Fairy Tales to Russian and Japanese folktales to Bre'r Rabbit tales from the South. The variety of illustrations is amazing, each with its own qualities. Some are narrative, some are mainly dialogue, some are wordless. Speaking of dialogue, "Hansel & Gretel"- illustrated by Gilbert 'Beto' Hernandez- is hilarious...at least I thought it was. It was...I don't quite know how to explain it. The only way I can think of is, like, overdramatic overacting. LOVED it! Luke Pearson's "The Boy Who Drew Cats" also had me chuckling- in a more adorable "Bartleby the Scribner" kind of way. I went in not knowing much about certain cartoonists. When I got to "The Prince and the Tortoise" I thought "this is really similar to classic comics- like Prince Valiant or something." Turns out Ramona Fradon illustrated Aquaman in Super Friends. The same happened with the story "Sweet Porridge." "Hmmm...this is kind of nostalgic cartooning...reminds me of Popeye." Again, Bobby London illustrated the Popeye comic strip from the mid-80s to early 90s. I'm actually both proud and ashamed of myself for placing (yet not placing) these cartoonists. There's a great list of contributors in the back which is helpful for both recognizing artists, and noting future works of theirs to look into. One of my favorites was Gigi D.G.'s interpretation of "Little Red Riding Hood." The artwork was beautiful and adorable. Like, in the event of future Little Sare-endipities...I'd love to do a nursery in this style. There was also some girl power in this version, which I am always happy about! I won't give the twist away, though! The same with Raina Telgemeier's "Rapunzel" [cue Spice Girls!] The range of stories, the range of artistic styles and talent, the range of humor...this has something for everyone. If you love fairytales and folktales, bright colors, humor, and pure awesomeness- get this graphic novel. I have a feeling this will become as treasured as my Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales (and has much better illustrations!)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barb Middleton

    I had problems seeing the text in this graphic novel. I bought it on the Kindle and the format would not let me enlarge the font and it only had the landscape option for a two-page spread. I need one of those ornate magnifying glasses they sell in Taiwan for older people who can't read the tiny Chinese characters on labels. Never had a book make me feel old before. Nose pressed to the glass, I will remember my eye strain more than the stories. While there were some funny fairytale twists, I I had problems seeing the text in this graphic novel. I bought it on the Kindle and the format would not let me enlarge the font and it only had the landscape option for a two-page spread. I need one of those ornate magnifying glasses they sell in Taiwan for older people who can't read the tiny Chinese characters on labels. Never had a book make me feel old before. Nose pressed to the glass, I will remember my eye strain more than the stories. While there were some funny fairytale twists, I thought the illustrations were more memorable than the stories. Hmmm... guess that makes sense considering I couldn't read some speech bubbles. The writing twists are subtle in some tales such as "Little Red Riding Hood," that follows the classic but the lumberjack is a woman. Snow White follows the same too but begins with a cross-eyed queen pricking her finger and wishing for a child as white as snow with blood-red lips and hair as black as her embroidery frame. Snow white as a baby looks like the female version of Casper The Friendly ghost. Her eyes cross too. When the bell-hop prince with buck teeth comes to kiss her I was wondering what hilarious setup was coming. I was not disappointed. It's pretty funny. "The Boy Who Drew Cats" was my favorite. Creepy, humorous, with a good message it reminded me of the character from "Harold and the Purple Crayon" with a bit of Tintin mixed in. The misunderstood child just wants to draw cats while the adults around him try to force difference occupations on him. When his cat drawings turn into vampires, he is forced to be a warrior. The trickster tale of the rabbit has strange illustrations with a clear moral. Rapunzel is a lassoing strong women that rescues the prince and "Baba Yaga" has illustrations that are gorgeous. I would recommend getting the book and passing on the electronic version.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    I found this version of classic tales very enjoyable. The illustrations in this graphic novel are phenomenal and really hold the reader’s interest. I heard most of these stories when I was younger however; there was one that was unfamiliar to me. This unfamiliar story was The Twelve Dancing Princesses. The story starts with twelve princesses who all share the same bedroom. Each night they are locked in their room yet, in the morning their shoes are worn like they have been dancing the night I found this version of classic tales very enjoyable. The illustrations in this graphic novel are phenomenal and really hold the reader’s interest. I heard most of these stories when I was younger however; there was one that was unfamiliar to me. This unfamiliar story was The Twelve Dancing Princesses. The story starts with twelve princesses who all share the same bedroom. Each night they are locked in their room yet, in the morning their shoes are worn like they have been dancing the night away. The king proclaims that anyone who can solve the mystery can marry one of his daughters. Many try and do not succeed. An adventurer is traveling through the kingdom and stumbles upon and old woman. The woman is poor and hungry. The man helps the woman and she is so thankful for his help that she gives him some advice and an invisible cloak. He travels to the king to solve the mystery. The princesses lift a bed in their room, which leads to another castle, and the adventurer follows them, in his invisible cloak of course! He discovers that they dance all night with many princes and return in the morning with their shoes worn out. He grabs a chalice to prove his story. In return for telling their secret to the king, the adventurer gets to marry one of his daughters. Naturally all of the kingdom’s members celebrate by dancing the night away! Lower elementary teachers might use this graphic novel to have students compare and contrast classic tales. Students could use this book along with a variety of other fairy tale books to find those similarities and differences. In an upper elementary classroom students could have a literature circle using this book. One of their discussions may be looking for a common theme in classic tales.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Barnhart

    1) These fairy tales are rewritten in simplicity with illustrations. The story is very clear with the characters thoughts and speech in bubbles with clarification as to the speaker. The stories were easy to follow and understand by following the panels. There are seventeen stories in the text. Each one is illustrated and adapted by different people. Some of the comical adaptations were creative in the depiction of the bad guy or modern touches to an older tale. This adds to the value of the text 1) These fairy tales are rewritten in simplicity with illustrations. The story is very clear with the characters thoughts and speech in bubbles with clarification as to the speaker. The stories were easy to follow and understand by following the panels. There are seventeen stories in the text. Each one is illustrated and adapted by different people. Some of the comical adaptations were creative in the depiction of the bad guy or modern touches to an older tale. This adds to the value of the text as a graphic novel. It is truly a collections of short stories that could be read individually or together. 2) I found the panels to be helpful for setting up the sequencing of the fairy tales. This could be used with struggling learners or ones who have difficulty in sequencing. The fairy tale background appeals to me for teaching in units with putting the steps of the story together. I use the fairy tale in this lesson for middle school students and this would be a great format for the elementary level. The stories were not selections that are used a great deal and the perspective for the story was fresh. I would use this K-4. It could even be used for upper elementary for struggling readers or as a focus for one particular skill or concept in the literature. 3) My reservations for this selection would be in the family structures that are brought out in some of the stories like in Hansel and Gretel. Knowing the backgrounds and family structure of the students would be helpful in selection of one that is not offensive. The stepmother is often depicted as evil.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Fairy Tale Comics 1)This is a collection of different fairy tales by different cartoonists. Some are easier to read then others (an easier example would be “Little Red Riding Hood”; a more difficult piece is “The Small Tooth). But since each story is short, students should be able to breeze through the easy ones and focus a little more on the harder ones. Most of the stories are also familiar so that would help with comprehension, although a few are unfamiliar so pose a positive challenge. Fairy Tale Comics 1)This is a collection of different fairy tales by different cartoonists. Some are easier to read then others (an easier example would be “Little Red Riding Hood”; a more difficult piece is “The Small Tooth). But since each story is short, students should be able to breeze through the easy ones and focus a little more on the harder ones. Most of the stories are also familiar so that would help with comprehension, although a few are unfamiliar so pose a positive challenge. 2)Grade Level: (I’m relying on the reviews I read to determine age and grade levels since this is a new genre for me and I don’t have any personal experience in this area.) Reviews put this book at a variety of ages and levels because of the differences in cartoon styles. Ages 6-12 are suggested and grades 1-7. Audience and/or Book Bundle Topics: Fairy Tale Lovers (would definitely have put this with my Fairy Tale Text-Set Bookshelf)and Art Lovers could use this to compare cartoonist styles, such as which stories students like the best, find the cartoonists’ names at the end of the book and read other graphic novels they’ve produced. 3)Depending on age and reading levels the teacher might not want to assign the whole book but pick out individual stories that would be appropriate for the reader. Since the stories are drawn by different cartoonists they could be individually matched up to students.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Seventeen familiar and lesser-known fairy tales get the graphic treatment in this comic compendium. Following on the heels of Nursery Rhyme Comics, Duffy has chosen nineteen well-known cartoonists to put their spin on tales from Grimm and other cultures. Favorites like “Rapunzel”, “Hansel and Gretel” and Rumpelstiltskin are featured alongside "Give Me the Shudders", "The Prince and the Tortoise" and "The Boy Who Drew Cats". From the wordless “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” to the over-the-top “ Seventeen familiar and lesser-known fairy tales get the graphic treatment in this comic compendium. Following on the heels of Nursery Rhyme Comics, Duffy has chosen nineteen well-known cartoonists to put their spin on tales from Grimm and other cultures. Favorites like “Rapunzel”, “Hansel and Gretel” and Rumpelstiltskin are featured alongside "Give Me the Shudders", "The Prince and the Tortoise" and "The Boy Who Drew Cats". From the wordless “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” to the over-the-top “Puss in Boots”, each tale is a winner. Astute graphics fans will recognize some of the artists and their artwork. Familiarity with the originals is a plus but not a must as some of the settings and designs stray from the originals. There are no “happily ever afters” here, and many of the familiar characters have had brilliant makeovers. The illustrations range from old-style comics to computer generated drawings. Some of the illustrations reflect the stories’ origins, and all are spirited and humorous. Back pages feature editor’s notes with helpful websites and a spread with thumbnail sketches and illustrations of the contributors. It’s a quirky and energetic sendup of traditional fairy tale books that readers of all ages can appreciate and enjoy. Graphics fans will find this title enjoyable and art and ELAR teachers might find it a useful resource as well. All in all it’s a fun read and a worthwhile addition to any library.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maeghan K

    While I did, overall, enjoy all of the comics in this collection, I really loved the depictions of these tales in particular: The Boy Who Drew Cats, Puss in Boots, The Prince and the Tortoise, and Bremen Town. I had never even heard those stories before! I loved seeing art from Jillian Tamaki (of This One Summer fame) and Brett Helquist, whose artwork is just lovely. It was nice to see a piece from Raina Telgemeier, but I don't think her contribution is enough of a grab to recommend to Smile While I did, overall, enjoy all of the comics in this collection, I really loved the depictions of these tales in particular: The Boy Who Drew Cats, Puss in Boots, The Prince and the Tortoise, and Bremen Town. I had never even heard those stories before! I loved seeing art from Jillian Tamaki (of This One Summer fame) and Brett Helquist, whose artwork is just lovely. It was nice to see a piece from Raina Telgemeier, but I don't think her contribution is enough of a grab to recommend to Smile fans. That being said, her version of Rapunzel was very cute! And I just learned that Chris Duffy was the editor of Nickelodeon Magazine's comics section back in the mid-90s to late 2000s. Thanks for making my childhood a little more fun, dude! Up until recently, I still had a copy of Nick Mag's "special edition" comics, including "Scene but not Heard" and the series about walking, talking pieces of fried chicken (the name escapes me at the moment). Fun read--very quick, too.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This is jam-packed with big name artists and the fairy tales highlighted range from the well-known to the lesser-known. I loved how different each of the artists approached their story telling -- some packed in most of the fairy tale into their work while others edited to very essential elements. Like any compilation, some were better than others, though they were all worthwhile. My favorites included: - "Hansel and Gretel" by Gilbert Hernandez (The ending actually made me laugh because of how This is jam-packed with big name artists and the fairy tales highlighted range from the well-known to the lesser-known. I loved how different each of the artists approached their story telling -- some packed in most of the fairy tale into their work while others edited to very essential elements. Like any compilation, some were better than others, though they were all worthwhile. My favorites included: - "Hansel and Gretel" by Gilbert Hernandez (The ending actually made me laugh because of how well-done the art is) - "Little Red Riding Hood" by Gigi D. G. (The lumberjack is a woman, which was perhaps my favorite "twist" on any of the fairy tales presented here) - "The Boy Who Drew Cats" by Luke Pearson - "Rapunzel" by Raina Telgemeier - "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" by Graham Annable (It's wordless!)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    I can see it now: the kids at the library will LOVE this book. Graphic novels are quickly becoming all the range and we cannot keep comic books on the shelves (especially during these summer months.) How nice it will be to add this to the collection My favorite feature was that each comic/story was done by a different cartoonist. It makes the reader want to see story after story.....so they can see the different styles of pictures. Another thing I liked bordered on a dislike. There was variety of I can see it now: the kids at the library will LOVE this book. Graphic novels are quickly becoming all the range and we cannot keep comic books on the shelves (especially during these summer months.) How nice it will be to add this to the collection My favorite feature was that each comic/story was done by a different cartoonist. It makes the reader want to see story after story.....so they can see the different styles of pictures. Another thing I liked bordered on a dislike. There was variety of different stories, some classic tales of which I was not familiar. I would have enjoy seeing more familiar ones in cartoon form, but I also like that this was different! A huge thanks to Netgalley and First Second Books for an ARC of this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    Fairy Tale Comics takes several old tales and translates them into graphic format. The tales include Puss in Boots, 12 Dancing Princesses, Baba Yaga and many many more. I like the graphic format and think it works really well for fairy tales. However, I feel like some of these tales have been shortened or abridged or just plain changed. It kind of seems like that takes away some of the magic of the tales. I think the illustrations are outstanding though. They are diverse and really fit each of Fairy Tale Comics takes several old tales and translates them into graphic format. The tales include Puss in Boots, 12 Dancing Princesses, Baba Yaga and many many more. I like the graphic format and think it works really well for fairy tales. However, I feel like some of these tales have been shortened or abridged or just plain changed. It kind of seems like that takes away some of the magic of the tales. I think the illustrations are outstanding though. They are diverse and really fit each of the tales. I wish the narrative was as good as the pictures, but this is a fun quick read and a good introduction to fairy tales. I received a copy of this book from the publisher on Netgalley.com.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I was torn between 4 and 5 stars for this, but I'm giving it 5 because of the way it offers a new version of old tales. It's a nice mix of European and nonEuropean stories, and it mixes male and female protagonists. These aren't parodies or "fractured" tales; they are simply adaptations to a visual format. Many of these stories stem from oral traditions, and some of these fluid tales have stagnated in a fixed printed form. Now, this collection breathes new life into centuries-old characters by I was torn between 4 and 5 stars for this, but I'm giving it 5 because of the way it offers a new version of old tales. It's a nice mix of European and nonEuropean stories, and it mixes male and female protagonists. These aren't parodies or "fractured" tales; they are simply adaptations to a visual format. Many of these stories stem from oral traditions, and some of these fluid tales have stagnated in a fixed printed form. Now, this collection breathes new life into centuries-old characters by giving readers a chance to experience them anew. An oral storyteller might put his or her own spin on a story, and that's exactly the same power that these artists have reclaimed. Highly recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alanna (The Flashlight Reader)

    Well this was just fun! It's the perfect combination of graphic novel and fairytale anthology. In this book, you will find the well-known fairytales, but you'll also find a few you might not know about. For instance, I had never heard of "The Boy Who Drew Cats" or "The Princes and the Tortoise." The stories are well told; they are simple but do not leave out the major elements. I think the format of this book makes each of these fairytales accessible to all readers. The combination of Well this was just fun! It's the perfect combination of graphic novel and fairytale anthology. In this book, you will find the well-known fairytales, but you'll also find a few you might not know about. For instance, I had never heard of "The Boy Who Drew Cats" or "The Princes and the Tortoise." The stories are well told; they are simple but do not leave out the major elements. I think the format of this book makes each of these fairytales accessible to all readers. The combination of illustraions is also enjoyable. Some stories are ellaborately illustrated, while other take a more simplistic approach. Either way, it's going to be a hit with any fan of fairytales.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Using the brothers Grimm and some other sources Duffy has compiled a delightful and colorful variety of tales rendered in different styles and media by eighteen artists. Some are drawn and colored in traditional comic book layers of pencil, ink and colors and others are digitally painted. There’s a very funny wordless “Golidlocks and the three Bears.” Some use a limited palette of subdued colors, others a full bright one. There’s not a dull adaptation of a tale or art in the whole collection, Using the brothers Grimm and some other sources Duffy has compiled a delightful and colorful variety of tales rendered in different styles and media by eighteen artists. Some are drawn and colored in traditional comic book layers of pencil, ink and colors and others are digitally painted. There’s a very funny wordless “Golidlocks and the three Bears.” Some use a limited palette of subdued colors, others a full bright one. There’s not a dull adaptation of a tale or art in the whole collection, but there is an abundance of droll humor that will appeal to readers of all ages.

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