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Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists

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First Second is very proud to present Nursery Rhyme Comics. Featuring fifty classic nursery rhymes illustrated and interpreted in comics form by fifty of today’s preeminent cartoonists and illustrators, this is a groundbreaking new entry in the canon of nursery rhymes treasuries. From New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s “There Was a Crooked Man” to Bad Kitty author Nick Bruel’s “T First Second is very proud to present Nursery Rhyme Comics. Featuring fifty classic nursery rhymes illustrated and interpreted in comics form by fifty of today’s preeminent cartoonists and illustrators, this is a groundbreaking new entry in the canon of nursery rhymes treasuries. From New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s “There Was a Crooked Man” to Bad Kitty author Nick Bruel’s “Three Little Kittens” to First Second’s own Gene Yang’s “Pat-a-Cake,” this is a collection that will put a grin on your face from page one and keep it there. Each rhyme is one to three pages long, and simply paneled and lettered to ensure that the experience is completely accessible for the youngest of readers. Chock full of engaging full-color artwork and favorite characters (Jack and Jill! Old Mother Hubbard! The Owl and the Pussycat!), this collection will be treasured by children for years to come.


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First Second is very proud to present Nursery Rhyme Comics. Featuring fifty classic nursery rhymes illustrated and interpreted in comics form by fifty of today’s preeminent cartoonists and illustrators, this is a groundbreaking new entry in the canon of nursery rhymes treasuries. From New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s “There Was a Crooked Man” to Bad Kitty author Nick Bruel’s “T First Second is very proud to present Nursery Rhyme Comics. Featuring fifty classic nursery rhymes illustrated and interpreted in comics form by fifty of today’s preeminent cartoonists and illustrators, this is a groundbreaking new entry in the canon of nursery rhymes treasuries. From New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s “There Was a Crooked Man” to Bad Kitty author Nick Bruel’s “Three Little Kittens” to First Second’s own Gene Yang’s “Pat-a-Cake,” this is a collection that will put a grin on your face from page one and keep it there. Each rhyme is one to three pages long, and simply paneled and lettered to ensure that the experience is completely accessible for the youngest of readers. Chock full of engaging full-color artwork and favorite characters (Jack and Jill! Old Mother Hubbard! The Owl and the Pussycat!), this collection will be treasured by children for years to come.

30 review for Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    There are 50 Nursery Rhymes in this collection by 50 different artists. It's a fun book that tells the classic rhymes, some of them in an updated setting. Many of these I have forgotten and I certainly didn't remember. It's a nice book that kids will enjoy seeing the pictures that go with the rhymes. They have a companion called Fairy Tale Comics with the same format. First second pushes boundaries. They are a great company and this is for younger kids. They have older comics as well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    A. Somers

    This would be a great book to use to teach dialogue and setting. Plus it's a fun way to teach Nursery Rhmyes. Too many students today are unfamiliar with traditional nursery rhymes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Nursery rhymes. What's up with that? (I feel like a stand up comedian when I put it that way). They're ubiquitous but nonsensical. Culturally relevant but often of unknown origins. Children’s literary scholar Leonard Marcus ponders the amazing shelf life of nursery rhymes himself and comes up with some answers. Why is it that they last as long as they do in the public consciousness? Marcus speculates that “the old-chestnut rhymes that beguile in part by sounding so emphatically clear about thems Nursery rhymes. What's up with that? (I feel like a stand up comedian when I put it that way). They're ubiquitous but nonsensical. Culturally relevant but often of unknown origins. Children’s literary scholar Leonard Marcus ponders the amazing shelf life of nursery rhymes himself and comes up with some answers. Why is it that they last as long as they do in the public consciousness? Marcus speculates that “the old-chestnut rhymes that beguile in part by sounding so emphatically clear about themselves while in fact leaving almost everything to our imagination” leave themselves open to interpretation. And who better to do a little interpreting than cartoonists? Including as many variegated styles as could be conceivably collected in a single 128-page book, editor Chris Duffy plucks from the cream of the children’s graphic novel crop (and beyond!) to create a collection so packed with detail and delight that you’ll find yourself flipping to the beginning to read it all over again after you’re done. Mind you, I wouldn’t go handing this to a three-year-old any time soon, but for a certain kind of child, this crazy little concoction is going to just the right bit of weirdness they require. Fifty artists are handed a nursery rhyme apiece. The goal? Illustrate said poem. Give it a bit of flair. Put in a plot if you have to. So it is that a breed of all new comics, those of the nursery ilk, fill this book. Here at last you can see David Macaulay bring his architectural genius to “London Bridge is Falling Down” or Roz Chast give “There Was a Crooked Man” a positive spin. Leonard Marcus offers an introduction giving credence to this all new coming together of text and image while in the back of the book editor Chris Duffy discusses the rhymes’ history and meaning. And as he says in the end, “We’re just letting history take its course.” In the interest of public scrutiny, the complete list of artists on this book consists of Nick Abadzis, Andrew Arnold, Kate Beaton, Vera Brosgol, Nick Bruel, Scott Campbell, Lilli Carre, Roz Chast, JP Coovert, Jordan Crane, Rebecca Dart, Eleanor Davis, Vanessa Davis, Theo Ellsworth, Matt Forsythe, Jules Feiffer, Bob Flynn, Alexis Frederick-Frost, Ben Hatke, Gilbert Hernandez, Jaime Hernandez, Lucy Knisley, David Macaulay, Mark Martin, Patrick McDonnell, Mike Mignola, Tony Millionaire, Tao Nyeu, George O’Connor, Mo Oh, Eric Orchard, Laura Park, Cyril Pedrosa, Lark Pien, Aaron Renier, Dave Roman, Marc Rosenthal, Stan Sakai, Richard Sala, Mark Siegel, James Sturm, Raina Telgemeier, Craig Thompson, Richard Thompson, Sara Varon, Jen Wang, Drew Weing, Gahan Wilson, Gene Luen Yang, and Stephanie Yue (whew!). And as with any collection, some of the inclusions are going to be stronger than others. Generally speaking if fifty people do something, some of them are going to have a better grasp on the process than others. That said, only a few of these versions didn’t do it for me. At worst the versions were mediocre. At best they went in a new direction with their material without getting too crazy. Nick Bruel, for example, does a great “Three Little Kittens”, filling it with pie-obsessed felines, while Craig Thompson gives his “The Owl and the Pussycat” a kind of John Steed/Emma Peel flair. The artist couldn’t necessarily agree on who the intended audience was either. Amazon, interestingly enough, lists this book as intended for “Baby-Preschool” readers. Um . . . yeah, probably not so much. Though some of these rhymes would be just fine for that age range if you read them aloud, but others just aren’t going to go over with the ankle biter set. Of course, there’s not a lot of consistency from one rhyme to another. You might read Lucy Knisley’s “There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe” where Knisley has justified the line “Then whipped them all soundly” by making the kids play the instruments of the Old Lady’s now defunct band “The Whips” (it’s a bit of a stretch, I know) then follow that up with the Eleanor Davis poem “The Queen of Hearts” which takes the line “And beat the knave full sore” and pretty much does just that. Or you might see Raina Telegemeier’s highly innocent “Georgie Porgie” followed up with Mike Mignola (the creator of Hellboy) and his dark mannequin-laden contemplation of mortality in “Solomon Grundy”. The tone shifts about a bit. That’s not a problem for a nine or ten-year-old capable of enjoying the dichotomies but for a kid learning them for the first time it’s going to be just too much. The choice of artists to include must have been fun. Some of these illustrators aren’t your standard go-to comic book creators for kids either. For example, Tony Millionaire has spent the better part of his professional life inspiring my nightmares with his alternative strip MAAKIES while I associate Gahan Wilson best with his New Yorker comics more than anything else. Other artists are part of the First Second family, like Gene Yang or Sara Varon. And then there are folks that editor Chris Duffy must have taken a chance on. Kate Beaton, creator of the hilarious and brilliant online strip Hark a Vagrant shines here with her “Duke of York”. Meanwhile Cul de Sac creator Richard Thompson gets to shine with his own “There Was an Old Woman Tossed Up in a Basket”. Finally, there are the picture book illustrators like Tao Nyeu or Marc Rosenthal who fit in so well you'd never imagine comics weren't their first love. Personally, I hope that maybe a graphic novel is in their own futures someday. The advantage of having such a deep well of artists to pull from is that you can usually find folks to fit your own tastes. Personally I felt that Cyril Pedrosa’s “This Little Piggy” and “The Lion and the Unicorn” by Aaron Renier were worthy of their own, albeit very short, books. And then there are the visual styles one prefers. I liked it the most when artists referenced some of the great illustrators of the past. Theo Ellsworth’s “As I Was Going to St. Ives”, for example, seems clearly influenced by Wanda Gag’s Millions of Cats, for example. And I can attest that it is a sheer delight to read a book of this sort in full color. From Cyril Pedrosa’s hot pink borders to Dave Roman’s penchant for purple, this book just wouldn’t be the same if the publisher hadn't splurged on a couple shades and tones here and there. Of course the danger of a book like this is that the reader gets greedy. A mere fifty artists? Couldn’t they get Harry Bliss, Jeff Smith, Art Spiegelman, Barry Deutsch, Hope Larson, yadda yadda yadda? Give people something awesome and they’ll always find a way to kvetch and demand more. Nursery Rhyme Comics deserves better than that, and will hopefully find its way onto many a child’s shelf. And it pairs rather splendidly with a similar collection of American Indian folktales illustrated by a range of graphic novelists called Trickster. If, however, you’d like to pair this book with its literary opposite (authors paired with a single piece of art rather than artists paired with a single short text) consider placing it alongside the fabulous Chronicles of Harris Burdick with art by Chris Van Allsburg. There are as many way to pair and display and talk up this book as there are artists inside of it. Likewise, there are as many ways to read and enjoy this book as there are children out there who would get a kick out of its pages. Whether they’re reading familiar rhymes or discovering new ones, Nursery Rhyme Comics gives kids everywhere a new way of encountering some essential cultural touchstones. Great good stuff. For ages 9-12.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scope

    It’s no secret we are living in the age of superstar team-ups. With Watch the Throne on the top of the Billboard charts, The Miami Heat making waves in the NBA, and The Avengers one of the most highly anticipated films of 2012, it’s hard to say otherwise. The beautiful Nursery Rhyme Comics is a superstar team-up of a different kind. No less than 50 of our best cartoonists and illustrators have contributed their interpretations of classic (and a number of lesser-known) nursery rhymes. While this It’s no secret we are living in the age of superstar team-ups. With Watch the Throne on the top of the Billboard charts, The Miami Heat making waves in the NBA, and The Avengers one of the most highly anticipated films of 2012, it’s hard to say otherwise. The beautiful Nursery Rhyme Comics is a superstar team-up of a different kind. No less than 50 of our best cartoonists and illustrators have contributed their interpretations of classic (and a number of lesser-known) nursery rhymes. While this collection may prompt you to reexamine your concept of audience, Nursery Rhyme Comics is a unique endeavor brimming with creativity. After a short introduction by children’s book historian Leonard S. Marcus, things get rolling with Patrick McDonnell’s comic take on The Donkey, a four line ditty that I likely haven’t heard since nursery school: Donkey, donkey, old and gray, Ope your mouth and gently bray; Lift your ears and blow your horn, To wake the world this sleepy morn. The accompanying illustrations show a seemingly glum donkey coming to life and blowing a saxophone solo, shocking a nearby bird. This opening cartoon makes something very clear: it’s all in the interpretation. What follows is a murderer’s row of cartoonists and illustrators, each playing by their own rules. Jules Feiffer turns in one of the more literal entries with Girls and Boys Come Out to Play, Eleanor Davis’s retelling of The Queen of Harts fits with her detailed Secret Science Alliance M.O., James Sturm gets cheeky with Jack Be Nimble, and if you can show me a more absurd take on One, Two, Buckle My Shoe than the one by Dave Roman, I’ll give you a pat on the back, then proceed to eat my wicker hat. The roster is impressively varied, the results almost always interesting. Paging through the book is an experience unto itself, as the variety of styles – all rendered in full color – are a striking sight. The concept of audience can be a tricky thing at times. Catering to your audience is often viewed in a negative light, but not taking the assumed reader into consideration also draws ire. Nursery Rhyme Comics may fall into the latter camp for some, as many of the comics will be most successful with 1st-4th graders rather than the standard preschool/kindergarten Mother Goose crowd. The paradox is that many nursery rhymes contain themes that already go over the heads of the PreK set. Another interesting side effect of this wildly interpretive cartoon overhaul is that it sometimes moves the story away from the familiarity of a song. Occasionally this is due to inserted dialog, but it is mostly due to the fact that reading a comic requires pauses to absorb the artwork. Long story short, it feels a bit weird to read There Was a Crooked Man or Hush, Little Baby without the familiar tempo. While this is part of the uniqueness of the book, it does adds a layer of sophistication that will work best with slightly older readers. So here’s my recommendation: Nursery Rhyme Comics shouldn’t be a child’s introduction to the genre, but consider this a wholly original next step.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sylvester

    5* art 5* concept Nursery rhymes are strange things. Part poetry, part history (what is peas porridge? or a posie?), part vocabulary lesson, part introduction to all the literary genres, and all weirdness. Squirt has never been very interested - until this book, and he just couldn't get enough of it. Each rhyme is illustrated by a different artist, and their take on it is individual and modern and sometimes very funny. Squirt's favorite by far is the "Jack Jumped Over a Candlesti 5* art 5* concept Nursery rhymes are strange things. Part poetry, part history (what is peas porridge? or a posie?), part vocabulary lesson, part introduction to all the literary genres, and all weirdness. Squirt has never been very interested - until this book, and he just couldn't get enough of it. Each rhyme is illustrated by a different artist, and their take on it is individual and modern and sometimes very funny. Squirt's favorite by far is the "Jack Jumped Over a Candlestick" one. Only one page, but we had to read it over and over and over in one sitting. Squirt had it memorized. And it IS very funny, Jack just says what we've all been thinking every time we've read that rhyme. A purist might think we should be keeping these rhymes as they were - but who even knows what that was? And there's a lot to be said for variations on a theme. It keeps our language fresh.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    "Great fun." A year after posting my succinct review, I've picked up this nursery rhyme cartoon anthology again at the library and still think it's wonderful, as do my children -- we definitely need our own copy. My hands down favorite rendition is Cyril Pedrosa's "This little Piggy." A few of the entries are a shade ho-hum, but that just makes one appreciate the quirky ones more. Keen scrutiny of Craig Thompson's "The Owl and the Pussycat" reveals that the runcible spoon is in fact a spork; that explai "Great fun." A year after posting my succinct review, I've picked up this nursery rhyme cartoon anthology again at the library and still think it's wonderful, as do my children -- we definitely need our own copy. My hands down favorite rendition is Cyril Pedrosa's "This little Piggy." A few of the entries are a shade ho-hum, but that just makes one appreciate the quirky ones more. Keen scrutiny of Craig Thompson's "The Owl and the Pussycat" reveals that the runcible spoon is in fact a spork; that explains so much.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

    I simply adore "Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists". I love the artwork and the rhymes reminiscent of childhood. My favorites are Eleanor Davis's "The Queen of Hearts" (I love the color scheme) and Laura Park's "Croak, Said the Toad" (I think the artwork just looks really cool). I also enjoyed Nick Bruel's "Three Little Kittens" just because I had read it so many times as a child. I would recommend this collection to cartoon/comic and nursery rhyme enthusiast I simply adore "Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists". I love the artwork and the rhymes reminiscent of childhood. My favorites are Eleanor Davis's "The Queen of Hearts" (I love the color scheme) and Laura Park's "Croak, Said the Toad" (I think the artwork just looks really cool). I also enjoyed Nick Bruel's "Three Little Kittens" just because I had read it so many times as a child. I would recommend this collection to cartoon/comic and nursery rhyme enthusiasts alike.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karissa

    I got a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program. It was a very fun read and something that I think kids of all ages and adults will both enjoy. There are a number (fifty to be exact) of nursery rhymes illustrated and retold in various ways. Some of them are just beautiful renditions of the nursery rhymes, some of them are ironic retellings, and some of them are fantastic re-imaginings. For example Jack Be Nimble has a little boy making asides about how stupid you would have I got a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program. It was a very fun read and something that I think kids of all ages and adults will both enjoy. There are a number (fifty to be exact) of nursery rhymes illustrated and retold in various ways. Some of them are just beautiful renditions of the nursery rhymes, some of them are ironic retellings, and some of them are fantastic re-imaginings. For example Jack Be Nimble has a little boy making asides about how stupid you would have to be to jump over a candlestick, then when he turns around at the end his pants have a hole burned in them. Three Little Kittens showed how the kittens lost, found, and even made more trouble with their mittens. Little Bo Peep looses her sheep, but her sheep are dream sheep that she counts to stay asleep. The above are just a few examples of the wonderful collection included. All of them were well done. Some were ironic and surprising, some just plain beautiful. The illustration style is all over the place; some are beautiful fantasies, some are cartoony, some are folk-art-like, there is even a sci-fi themed rendition. All are in full color and wonderful. My son, who is four, really enjoyed reading through this with me. He loved some of the twists on the nursery rhymes he already knows. Even my husband who walked by while we were reading this, ended up drawn in and sat down to finish the book with us. It was just such a creative take on a lot of the nursery rhymes; very entertaining and enjoyable to read. Overall I adored this book and am so glad I have it. It will be something I keep in my library so that my son and I can take it out and read it. Fans of nursery rhymes or graphic novels in general should give this a look through. It was wonderful to find something creative like this that both me and my four year old son really enjoyed reading. So if you have kids definitely buy this book and sit down and read it with them! It adds some wonderful excitement to old nursery rhymes and you will see them in a new light after reading this book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex Telander

    Everyone knows what a nursery rhyme is; many of us can still remember a number of them, or at least what they were about; and still a few more of us can recall certain nursery rhymes word for word; but ask any of us what they mean or how they got made up, and you’ll be greeted with a look of dumbfoundedness. What exactly is the deal with an egg falling off the wall, or two kids falling down a hill, or even a cow jumping over a moon? In Nursery Rhyme Comics, the artists explore these f Everyone knows what a nursery rhyme is; many of us can still remember a number of them, or at least what they were about; and still a few more of us can recall certain nursery rhymes word for word; but ask any of us what they mean or how they got made up, and you’ll be greeted with a look of dumbfoundedness. What exactly is the deal with an egg falling off the wall, or two kids falling down a hill, or even a cow jumping over a moon? In Nursery Rhyme Comics, the artists explore these familiar nursery rhymes with detailed illustrations, exploring the nuances and possible meanings behind various nursery rhymes. The book features great original and entertaining illustrations from many known comics’ artists and cartoonists, including Craig Thompson, Scott Campbell, Mike Mignola, Kate Beaton and many, many more. 50 well-known nursery rhymes are explored and elucidated upon by the skillful hands of 50 cartoonists, revealing these strange short stories to be the bizarre, confusing, and yet entertaining and unforgettable tales that they are. You may not find all the answers in Nursery Rhyme Comics, or the reasoning behind each of these nursery rhymes, but you will certainly be laughing out loud and enjoying yourself as you read them, and perhaps showing them to your kids, if you have any! Originally written on November 20, 2011 ©Alex C. Telander. For more reviews and exclusive interviews, go to the BookBanter site.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    I’m not a big reader of graphic novels although I’ve been trying to remedy that. And, one of the standout writers of that genre has been Gene Luen Yang of “American Born Chinese” and “The Eternal Smile”. It was while checking on what other things he’s written that I ran across “Nursery Rhyme Comics”. This is an anthology where cartoonists had free reign to re-imagine nursery rhymes. I was surprised by how many illustrators I recognized- like Patrick McDonnell, Nick Bruel, Jules Feiffe I’m not a big reader of graphic novels although I’ve been trying to remedy that. And, one of the standout writers of that genre has been Gene Luen Yang of “American Born Chinese” and “The Eternal Smile”. It was while checking on what other things he’s written that I ran across “Nursery Rhyme Comics”. This is an anthology where cartoonists had free reign to re-imagine nursery rhymes. I was surprised by how many illustrators I recognized- like Patrick McDonnell, Nick Bruel, Jules Feiffer, Craig Thompson, and David McCaulay. I thought this was a great way to sample different styles. These and certain interpretations really stood out- Mo Oh (Hush, Little Baby), Gene Luen Yang (Pat a Cake), Vera Bosgol (There Was a Little Girl), Mark Martin (Little Miss Muffet), David McCaulay (London Bridge is Falling Down), Ben Hatke (Pussycat, Pussycat, Where Have You Been?), Mike Mignola (Solomon Grundy) Stephanie Yue(Hickory, Dickory, Dock)and Patrick McDonnell (The Donkey) were the ones I liked most. (As someone who wants to break into the children’s picture book market, I’m also taking special effort to give credit to those who illustrate the books I read.) (Also, I’ve also been trying to notice publishers and First Second always seems to release books I want to read! I couldn’t believe how many of them artists owned cats!)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jency

    Such a cute book. I love such clever comics which helps relive my childhood! I esp love the illustration on 'There was an Old Lady who lived in a Shoe'. Such a cool spin. Every rhyme is so beautifully illustrated. I havent shared it with my toddler yet. Maybe when the time is right, she will love it too.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Scott Robins

    What a fantastic collection of the best cartoonists today and their personal takes on classic nursery rhymes - so fascinating with who went traditional and who went with a completely different interpretation.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    It is so fascinating how different illustrators decide to depict these nursery rhymes. While the rhymes stick to the traditional words we all know, many of the illustrations are wildly interpretive.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    I don't love all the cartoons but my kids are really into this book. It is a fun take on old nursery rhymes--some of which are quite creepy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lidya

    This is such a kool book. Classic Nursery Rhymes and Comics all in one. I love it and so does my son, definitely one for his/my collection :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I've updated my review to include my initial thoughts and my "I'm done with the book now" thoughts... :) I liked what I read on my first night of reading this book, but I somehow expected more. The comics are from a variety of styles, some more enjoyable than others. Some of the comics are very basic: just drawn to match the rhymes; while others are more fleshed out: these cartoonists really put their imaginations to use. I'm enjoying these the most, as with the Queen of Hearts by Ele I've updated my review to include my initial thoughts and my "I'm done with the book now" thoughts... :) I liked what I read on my first night of reading this book, but I somehow expected more. The comics are from a variety of styles, some more enjoyable than others. Some of the comics are very basic: just drawn to match the rhymes; while others are more fleshed out: these cartoonists really put their imaginations to use. I'm enjoying these the most, as with the Queen of Hearts by Eleanor Davis: I enjoyed reading first the rhyme and then the artist's suggested dialogue inserted into the comic. :) Like the Queen of Hearts, I'm enjoying the ones that are not just drawn to illustrate the words, with only the rhyme typed in to accompany the illustrations. And yet...The Owl and the Pussy-Cat by Craig Thompson was drawn to illustrate the words, with no additional words/dialogue inserted, but I still really enjoyed this one because the illustrations were such that they spoke volumes all on their own. :) Others of the ones I really liked that first night include The Donkey by Patrick McDonnell (simple but fun); Hickory, Dickory, Dock by Stephanie Yue (really liked this comic); There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe by Lucy Knisley (enjoyed the idea of the Old Woman being a hip babysitter); Jack Be Nimble by James Sturm (super cute illustrations); There Was a Crooked Man by Roz Chast (fun illustrations!); and Georgie Porgie by Raina Telgemeier (funny!). Another especial favorite from my first night's reading was This Little Piggy by Cyril Pedrosa: his vignettes to illustrate the piggy's actions were hilarious! The last panel is definitely smile-inducing. :) My second night opened with Croak Said the Toad by Laura Park. I don't understand the last two panels of this one. Well, I do (they're drawn straight-forward enough) but I don't see how they follow the rhyme and continue the story. Others I enjoyed this second night include Hot Cross Buns by Andrew Arnold (loved this comic!); Old Mother Hubbard by J. Crane (these panels made me smile, though the last one inspired a bittersweet smile); One, Two, Buckle My Shoe by Dave Roman (I loved the clones!); Little Miss Muffet by Mark Martin (Much to my surprise, I wasn't freaked out by the spider that frightened Little Miss Muffet); There Was a Little Girl by Vera Brosgol (This was a fun comic); Pat-a-Cake by Gene Luen Yang (loved the aliens!); and Hush, Little Baby by Mo Oh (charming illustrations). All in all, I really enjoyed a variety of styles that included the ones where the artists imagined the rhyme in somewhat basic ways (The Owl and the Pussy-Cat and Little Miss Muffet) and those where their imaginations took unusual turns (There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe and One, Two, Buckle My Shoe). For some of the good ones I've mentioned above, I was actually disappointed that the rhymes weren't longer so I could have seen more comic panels in the respective styles. :) And lastly, there were other comics in this book that I really liked (or didn't like, as the case may be) that I haven't mentioned above. To include my thoughts on all 50 comics would make this review even longer than it already is, and I think it's already approaching too-long status. :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Martelon

    Title: Nursery Rhyme Comics Author: Chris Duffy Illustrator: Different illustrators for each nursery rhyme Genre: Book of nursery rhymes Themes: Rhyming, comics, animals Opening line/sentence: Worlds collide: two art forms that kids love come together in this inspired collection of classic nursery rhymes interpreted by comics. Brief Book Summary: This book has 50 nursery rhymes included in it. However, these nursery rhymes are illustrated differently than normal. Al Title: Nursery Rhyme Comics Author: Chris Duffy Illustrator: Different illustrators for each nursery rhyme Genre: Book of nursery rhymes Themes: Rhyming, comics, animals Opening line/sentence: Worlds collide: two art forms that kids love come together in this inspired collection of classic nursery rhymes interpreted by comics. Brief Book Summary: This book has 50 nursery rhymes included in it. However, these nursery rhymes are illustrated differently than normal. All of the nursery rhymes included in this book are illustrated in comic form which children tend to love. Professional Recommendation #1: Publishers Weekly (Publishers Weekly) In this easy-to-read and fun to read aloud collection, classic nursery rhymes get a contemporary spin from artists as varied as the New Yorker's Roz Chast and Hellboy creator Mike Mignola. Each miniature story is beautifully colored, making each two-page spread a visual treat, and the traditional panel form of comics and graphic novels merge easily with the syncopated beats of the familiar rhymes. The interpretations of the nursery songs range from literal such as Lilli Carr 's "Sing a Song of Sixpence" to the slightly wacky. In Dave Roman's "One, Two, Buckle My Shoe," the numbers in the title refer to tiny clones created by a wizard inventor, with the help of gadgets like the Clone Master 3000 and the Mega Incubator. And any preconceived notions you have about old women living in footwear should be abandoned before reading Lucy Kinsley's delightfully original "There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe." Instead of a crotchety crone, the titular woman lives in a funky boot and runs Ruth's Rock & Rock Babysitting. Every panel explodes with enough rich detail to keep attention glued to the page. Ages 3 up. (Aug.)\n (PUBLISHER: First Second (New York:), PUBLISHED: 2011.) Professional Recommendation #2: CCBC (Cooperative Children's Book Center Choices, 2012) Fifty nursery rhymes have been given visual treatment by fifty different artists from the world of comics and graphic novels, picture books, and cartooning in this scintillating volume. Some artists take a literal approach and others take familiar verses to unexpected places. Cyril Pedrosa s This Little Piggy is darkly funny, Drew Weing s Baa Baa Black Sheep delightfully surprising, Mo Oh s Hush Little Baby comic and tender. Craig Thompson heightens the sensuality and romance of The Owl and the Pussycat with his visual storytelling. And who knew The Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe was an aging, guitar playing hippie running a daycare? Artist Lucy Knisley did. Leonard S. Marcus s introduction and Chris Duffy s editor s note offer insightful commentary on the nursery rhyme s place in both literature and literacy (although suggesting the text of this particular volume is accessible to beginning readers is a stretch with the varied fonts and nonlinear layout on many pages). Despite the nursery rhyme theme, older children and teens will find pleasure and inspiration in the pages of this singular, brilliant work. CCBC Category: Folklore, Mythology, and Traditional Literature. 2011, First Second, 119 pages, $18.99. Age 7 and older. (PUBLISHER: First Second (New York:), PUBLISHED: 2011.) Response to Two Professional Reviews: These two reviews loved this book. They both think that this different take on nursery rhymes illustration format was clever. Also they both enjoyed how the illustrators made their own take on the characters and drew them how they imagined it and not how the typical nursery rhyme is known. It is about the pictures and how a child can actually just look at the pictures and have an understanding of what is going on in the story. Evaluation of Literacy Elements: In this book there is not an overwhelming amount of words on each page so I think this is a good for younger children to read since they can just look at the illustrations and understand what is happening. Along with how much the words rhyme and the rhythm of the nursery rhymes it makes the children able to follow along easy because they can most likely predict what is going to happen next. I also think that this is a good example for teaching children that everyone has a different opinion and take on things since the illustrations are mostly not what the normal nursery rhymes consist of. Consideration of Instructional Application: I would use this book along with others to teach the children about rhyming and rhythm. This book would be good for an introduction to rhyming and rhythm since it is easy to follow for children.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marissa Sansone

    Title: Nursery Rhyme Comics Author: Chris Duffy Illustrator: Various illustrations for each nursery rhyme Genre: Book of Nursery Rhymes Theme(s): Rhyming, Comics, Animals Opening line/sentence: Worlds collide: two art forms that kids love come together in this inspired collection of classic nursery rhymes interpreted by comics. Brief Book Summary: This book is a compilation of 50 nursery. Young children can read as many or as little as they want. Kids can see their favorite nursery rhymes in comic form. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: (Horn Books) />Brief/>Opening/>:/>:/>:/>: Title: Nursery Rhyme Comics Author: Chris Duffy Illustrator: Various illustrations for each nursery rhyme Genre: Book of Nursery Rhymes Theme(s): Rhyming, Comics, Animals Opening line/sentence: Worlds collide: two art forms that kids love come together in this inspired collection of classic nursery rhymes interpreted by comics. Brief Book Summary: This book is a compilation of 50 nursery. Young children can read as many or as little as they want. Kids can see their favorite nursery rhymes in comic form. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: (Horn Books) 120 pp. Roaring Brook/First Second (Roaring Brook Press) 2011. (3) K-3 The compilation includes fifty nursery rhymes, all in panel format, from an impressive variety of cartoonists. Each of the rhymes--some of which are well known, others less so--is presented in a one- to three-page sequence. The artists find unexpected humor and drama in the classic stories. There's not a lot of cohesion, but the volume's variety provides great entertainment. Professional Recommendation/Review #2: (University Libraries) Ian Chapman, The Booklist Having 50 of the finest cartoonists draw simple nursery rhymes, each no more than two or three pages long, is such a crazy move that it's borderline genius. The ridiculously deep pool of talent here includes those who work in kids' comics circles (Eleanor Davis, Gene Luen Yang, Raina Telgemei er) and those more known in the indie scene (Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez, Tony Millionaire, Kate Beaton). Illustrating these near-nonsensical rhymes allows the artists all kinds of creative license. Some toy around with the original, like James Sturm's "Jack Be Nimble," in which Jack admonishes the reader for suggesting he do anything as foolish as jumping over a lit flame, only to turn away and reveal a scorched bum. Others play it more straight with equally splendid results, such as Craig Thompson's sumptuous take on "The Owl and the Pussycat." This collection is a truly dual-purpose book the dizzying array of visual styles will delight kids encountering these nursery rhymes for the first time, while the great versatility of the medium will make the familiar fresh again for their parents. As if all that weren't enough of a bounty, the esteemed Leonard S. Marcus provides a characteristically illuminating introduction. A can't-miss treasure chest for any collection. Response to Two Professional Reviews: Both of these reviews talk about the great entertainment that arises from this book of nursery rhymes. It is not only fun for kids to read, but the pictures give stimulation for parents while they are reading as well. Both of these reviews are positive, and I agree with them. I would definitely add this to a collection of nursery rhymes, and Ian Chapman says in the second review. Evaluation of Literary Elements: The comics in this book are very well done. All of the illustrations go very well with the text that is on the page. There are not too many words on the page, and it is easy to follow along with. It is perfect for young kids, because not only are the illustrations interesting to look at, but the rhyming nature of the nursery rhymes keep the reader engaged and interested. Consideration of Instructional Application: This book could be used when teaching young children about rhyming. The stories are easy enough for beginning readers to follow along with. It would be a good book to read out loud because kids will love to follow along with the rhymes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Meservier

    I think it's safe to say that most American children have experienced their fair share of nursery rhymes. I have memories of reciting them in preschool, and reading from a large hardcover book that collected and illustrated many of the most popular rhymes. Nursery Rhyme Comics takes the idea of the classic collection of nursery rhymes and updates it for our current graphic-novel hungry generation of youngsters. Each nursery rhyme is presented in comic strip form and runs from one to three pages I think it's safe to say that most American children have experienced their fair share of nursery rhymes. I have memories of reciting them in preschool, and reading from a large hardcover book that collected and illustrated many of the most popular rhymes. Nursery Rhyme Comics takes the idea of the classic collection of nursery rhymes and updates it for our current graphic-novel hungry generation of youngsters. Each nursery rhyme is presented in comic strip form and runs from one to three pages long. Well known classics such as “The Itsy Bitsy Spider,” “Hey Diddle Diddle.” and “Old Mother Hubbard,” are presented aside some lesser known rhymes such as “My Name is Yon Yonson” and “Solomon Grundy.” The reason I picked this collection up to read is due to the impressive collection of artists that can be found inside. I was familiar with a handful of them, such as American Born Chinese's Gene Luen Yang, Blankets' Craig Thompson, and Smile's Raina Telgemeier. Other artists I know by name, but have never experienced their work myself, such as Hark! A Vagrant's Kate Beaton, and Hellboy's Mike Mignola. One of the most enjoyable aspect about Nursery Rhyme Comics is the wide variety of content inside. All of the artwork is top notch, but because of the diverse collection of artists, no two comics look alike. Some are similar to what you might find in a cheerful picture book while others (Mike Mignola's in particular) are far from it. This also ends up being the collection's greatest fault when it comes to younger readers, as it's hard to interpret what age this collection was made for, as certain comics may be difficult to follow for some of the younger set. I really enjoyed watching how each artist chose to interpret their individual nursery rhyme. We may recite nursery rhymes to death, but typically it's more about rhythm of the language then the actual content. Choosing to interpret them through comic strips forces the author to create a visual context for lines that we may not often think about the meaning behind, therefore creating little miniature stories to go along with the rhythmic language. This is well illustrated in “My Name is Yon Yonson,” which interprets the endless repetition of the rhyme as a man running around a single block over and over, constantly introducing himself to a bewildered woman. I also enjoyed the modern updates that the illustrators made with their comics. Gene Luen Yang's “Pat-a-Cake” takes place on a space ship, “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe” involves a cloning machine, and “There Was and Old Woman who Lived in a Shoe” recasts the typically traditional old grannie as an aging rocker who runs a babysitting service. Nursery Rhyme Comics is a great update of the hardcover collection of nursery rhymes I remember reading as a child. The diverse collection of artists results is a vibrant collection filled with many interpretations of classic tales. I read it form cover to cover in one sitting, although I suspect younger readers will find themselves flipping through the pages to find their favorite rhyme.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tim Lewis

    Read the review and others like it on my blog: Tim's Book Reviews Premise: What happens when you take fifty of today’s cartoonists and you have them interpret and illustrate fifty classic nursery rhymes? You get a collection like this of re-imagined stories for people of all ages. You’ll see familiar stories such a Read the review and others like it on my blog: Tim's Book Reviews Premise: What happens when you take fifty of today’s cartoonists and you have them interpret and illustrate fifty classic nursery rhymes? You get a collection like this of re-imagined stories for people of all ages. You’ll see familiar stories such as Hey, Diddle Diddle, Little Boy Blue, and Jack and Jill, along with not so familiar (at least to me) such as The Donkey and For Want of a Nail, but each one puts a fresh spin on a classic story in only a few frames. Themes: Many classic nursery rhymes have themes of doing right and fearing punishment for wrongdoing, political satire, and propaganda. While this is true for some, most are rhymes either spoken or set to music simply to help children go to sleep. Rhymes and music can also help children with reasoning and learning ability, helping to improve math and reading skills. Pros: At first I thought this would just be another book of nursery rhymes, but as I flipped through the pages I realized the work and artistry that went into each story. Some of the stories, such as Hector Protector, took four lines of source material and elaborated it into an even more interesting story than I would have ever thought. Many of the rhymes are reinvented, such as the clones of One, Two, Buckle My Shoe or the rock band babysitting of There Was An Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe. Others, such as The Itsy Bitsy Spider, were straightforward illustrations of the nursery rhyme we already know. Quite a few of the stories were funny, and every page is pretty. Cons: A few of the stories have language that will be difficult to understand for young readers, and in some cases, as with The Owl and the Pussycat, the changes in language over time can be confusing or vulgar by today’s standings without the appropriate explanation. In at least one story, Jack Be Nimble, there is a word that I wouldn't want my child saying (stupid). Recommendations: I found Nursery Rhyme Comics to be a visually stunning collection of humorous and inspiring interpretations of classic rhymes for people of all ages. I think I enjoyed it even more than my son. A few of the stories might be a little more mature than intended, using language that is either inappropriate or antiquated, but discerning parents can easily skip over them or help younger readers understand them better. I am glad this book is in our home to be read as my children grow, but also so I can enjoy these stories with them. I love this collection. Do yourself and your family a favor and get a copy to read to your kids before bed.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    (Primary) Nursery Rhyme Comics 1. This graphic novel will be a wonderful addition to my personal library. I recently purchased this book on my Nook. The first unit I teach to my preschool students is “school beginnings” and we focus on a few nursery rhymes. This book will really add a nice twist to the rhymes we read and recite in class and provided the students with simple, bright and visual images. 2.This book can be used with the first unit of student in my preschool curriculum and can b (Primary) Nursery Rhyme Comics 1. This graphic novel will be a wonderful addition to my personal library. I recently purchased this book on my Nook. The first unit I teach to my preschool students is “school beginnings” and we focus on a few nursery rhymes. This book will really add a nice twist to the rhymes we read and recite in class and provided the students with simple, bright and visual images. 2.This book can be used with the first unit of student in my preschool curriculum and can be used with children in preschool and kindergarten. This would be a great book for students who are beginning to read independently. The pictures can help the reader see what is coming next and the familiar rhymes can aide in the students’ literacy development. 3. (2011, August 1). Publishers Weekly. http://www.booksinprint.com.leo.lib.u...# In this easy-to-read and fun to read aloud collection, classic nursery rhymes get a contemporary spin from artists as varied as the New Yorker's Roz Chast and Hellboy creator Mike Mignola. Each miniature story is beautifully colored, making each two-page spread a visual treat, and the traditional panel form of comics and graphic novels merge easily with the syncopated beats of the familiar rhymes. The interpretations of the nursery songs range from literal-such as Lilli Carre's "Sing a Song of Sixpence" to the slightly wacky. In Dave Roman's "One, Two, Buckle My Shoe," the numbers in the title refer to tiny clones created by a wizard inventor, with the help of gadgets like the Clone Master 3000 and the Mega Incubator. And any preconceived notions you have about old women living in footwear should be abandoned before reading Lucy Kinsley's delightfully original "There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe." Instead of a crotchety crone, the titular woman lives in a funky boot and runs Ruth's Rock & Rock Babysitting. Every panel explodes with enough rich detail to keep attention glued to the page. Ages 3-up. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    Nursery rhymes are classic poetic stories that I have loved as a child and as an adult. They are just so recognizable and short where it's impossible not to know them. There were a couple of nursery rhymes in this graphic novel that I didn't recognize but enjoyed nonetheless. Some of the rhymes were just alright and the illustrations too while there were other that I adored the way the story was presented with the illustrations retelling classic nursery rhymes. Here are some of the nursery rhyme Nursery rhymes are classic poetic stories that I have loved as a child and as an adult. They are just so recognizable and short where it's impossible not to know them. There were a couple of nursery rhymes in this graphic novel that I didn't recognize but enjoyed nonetheless. Some of the rhymes were just alright and the illustrations too while there were other that I adored the way the story was presented with the illustrations retelling classic nursery rhymes. Here are some of the nursery rhymes I really enjoyed: Hickory Dickory Dock by Stephanie Yue Probably the cutest little mouse has the job of hitting a clock at one. This was such a clever little remake and origin of why the mouse is climbing up the clock. He's got a job to do! Little Miss Muffet by Mark Martin The spider that sat beside Miss Muffet is smiling his nicest smile but he has terrifying teeth so Miss Muffet runs away. The spider is so cute and looks like the perfect little gentleman. Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater by Eric Orchard This rhyme was going south with me because Peter couldn't keep his wife so he just put her in a pumpkin shell but then he falls in love again I believe. He has some troubles with her too because she loves to read but he ends up learning to write and spell. Now he likes reading books with her and they lived happily ever after. Such a sweet ending. There Was a Little Girl by Vera Brosgol The funniest comic out there and it's by the girl who wrote and illustrated Anya's Ghost! The rhyme starts off so innocent and sweet but then when she gets hungry she gets horrid so you see her big and fat consuming a whole cake on her own at the end. The Queen of Hearts Eleanor Davis I feel like I may or may not have heard of this rhyme before but either way, it was light and fun and about strawberry tarts. I particularly like the color scheme to the illustrations. It feels very popeye to me for some reason too.

  23. 4 out of 5

    LeAnn Suchy

    Originally reviewed at Minnesota Reads. Regardless of age, many of us probably know the same nursery rhymes. I think I was always partial to “Three Blind Mice” and “Humpty Dumpty,” though I have no clue why I liked the idea of the poor egg not being able to be put back together again. While designed for kids, Nursery Rhyme Comics, with fifty different cartoonists taking a stab at the beloved rhymes, is great for both young and old. The whole time I read it I was smiling, not only be Originally reviewed at Minnesota Reads. Regardless of age, many of us probably know the same nursery rhymes. I think I was always partial to “Three Blind Mice” and “Humpty Dumpty,” though I have no clue why I liked the idea of the poor egg not being able to be put back together again. While designed for kids, Nursery Rhyme Comics, with fifty different cartoonists taking a stab at the beloved rhymes, is great for both young and old. The whole time I read it I was smiling, not only because the old rhymes were brought to life, but because some of the cartoonists took cute and hilarious liberties with the rhymes. Most of the comics are just two pages long, but some of the cartoonists create great stories in those two pages. Mo Ho turned “Hush Little Baby” into a dad getting more and more frustrated that the gifts he buys his little girl never work. The frustration of the dad and mischievousness of the adorable girl, with glasses way too big for her face, is priceless. The animals in Bob Flynn's “Little Boy Blue” get away with everything, even poker night, while little boy blue sleeps the day away. The images of the boy sprawled over the haystacks still make me smile. The one that made me laugh out loud was James Sturm's take on “Jack Be Nimble.” Jack turns to the reader and scolds us for wanting him to jump over a candlestick. The sight of his little burnt bum as he walks away is so damn cute. “Hickory, Dickory, Dock” by Stephanie Yue is also really cute. She turns the table on the tale of the mouse being spooked by the clock. In her version, the clock only rings because of the mouse and a mallet as big as his body. Nursery Rhyme Comics is a sweet, cute, funny collection. It’s great to see what the cartoonists have done with the nursery rhymes and some of them have me intrigued enough that I will seek out other things they’ve created.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    With 50 nursery rhymes illustrated by an talented array of leading cartoonists, this book is a visual feast. Each cartoonist was asked by editor Chris Duffy to interpret a different nursery rhyme, one suited to their particular taste or style. The result is a humorous, often quirky collection of some old favorites and some lesser-known traditional rhymes. Some pairings play off the cartoonists’ reputations - Nick Bruel, well-known for his Bad Kitty series (Bad Kitty Takes a Bath, Roaring Brook, With 50 nursery rhymes illustrated by an talented array of leading cartoonists, this book is a visual feast. Each cartoonist was asked by editor Chris Duffy to interpret a different nursery rhyme, one suited to their particular taste or style. The result is a humorous, often quirky collection of some old favorites and some lesser-known traditional rhymes. Some pairings play off the cartoonists’ reputations - Nick Bruel, well-known for his Bad Kitty series (Bad Kitty Takes a Bath, Roaring Brook, 2008) illustrates “Three Little Kittens”, with the kittens ending up eating pie with messy delight. Other artists lend thoroughly modern reinterpretations. Lucy Knisley sets “There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe” at “Ruth’s Rock & Roll Baby Sitting” where Ruth - a tattooed old rocker - entertains the children, inviting them to play with her band “The Whips” - and so finding a nice justification for the line “and whipped them all soundly” before she sent them to bed. While some artists take light-hearted comic approaches, as Jordan Crane does with “Old Mother Hubbard,” others choose definitely darker, more sophisticated - or perhaps even bizarre - approaches. Michael Mignola (Hellboy, Dark Horse Books, 2003) imagines “Solomon Grundy” as a wooden mannequin, full of dark tones in this refrain about a man’s sudden demise. While this collection will certainly draw in readers who already love comics, the audience is not the traditional nursery rhyme audience of preschoolers and toddlers. The rhyming and repetition of the traditional nursery rhymes, combined with the quirky, fresh illustrations, will be a perfect match for developing (and reluctant) middle grade readers. The introduction and editor’s note provide interesting information about the collection. End notes give details on each contributing illustrator.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jackie B. - Death by Tsundoku

    What a delightful collection of nursery rhymes! Growing up, I owned a beautiful collection of Nursery Rhymes. My mother would read them to me all the time. It contained a grand collection of watercolors for each rhyme. I particularly enjoyed when my mother sang the rhymes aloud to me (I will certainly need to locate that book!). However, that collection, being hard-backed with gold filigree, was something fancy and special. What I love about this collection of rhymes is how informal i What a delightful collection of nursery rhymes! Growing up, I owned a beautiful collection of Nursery Rhymes. My mother would read them to me all the time. It contained a grand collection of watercolors for each rhyme. I particularly enjoyed when my mother sang the rhymes aloud to me (I will certainly need to locate that book!). However, that collection, being hard-backed with gold filigree, was something fancy and special. What I love about this collection of rhymes is how informal it feels. Children's literary scholar Leonard Marcus gathered a collection of comic and graphic novel artists, assigned them all a rhyme, and said: Make it come to life. The result lays itself out in a whimsical and creative fashion in these 100+ pages. Some of these rhymes really shine based on the creative direction the artist takes them. Many of these rhymes are reimagined, given an ironic twice, or even stuck very standardly to the retelling. All are beautiful. This makes the collection very entertaining and enjoyable to read. In an introduction, Marcus discusses how his studies of these "nutshell narratives featuring quirk, vivid characters with quirky, vivid names" lend themselves easily to the world of comic illustration. It's easy to see how the words and scheme of rhymes can tickle the imagination. Now add some of the most creative artistic minds of the day and we have a brilliant potion. As Marcus says, "Lucky us to be living in a time of such free-flowing cross-pollination in the graphic and narrative arts." Like I said, a gorgeous collection of nursery rhymes. Completely the opposite from what I grew up with, but it pushes the imagination and interpretation of these words. Recommended to all.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    A new take on many famous nursery rhymes and a few new ones as well. While the traditional nursery rhyme text is there the cartoonists took some liberties to add their own style and flair to these classic rhymes. The illustrations are unique to the variety of artists who contributed their talents. Some hold true to the traditional nature of the rhyme "Three Little Kitten's" while others take a more modern twist "There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe" featuring a tattooed, rock n' roll grand A new take on many famous nursery rhymes and a few new ones as well. While the traditional nursery rhyme text is there the cartoonists took some liberties to add their own style and flair to these classic rhymes. The illustrations are unique to the variety of artists who contributed their talents. Some hold true to the traditional nature of the rhyme "Three Little Kitten's" while others take a more modern twist "There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe" featuring a tattooed, rock n' roll grandmother-like babysitter, and "Jack Be Nimble" with a young boy with a major attitude and burned bare bottom from trying to jump over a candle. Others still might be a little disturbing to very young readers "Solomon Grundy" and "This Little Piggy" the first drawn in somber, disturbing colors and motifs and the second showing what happens to the little piggies when the wolf is added to the story. This book would provide the perfect opportunity to do a cross curricular unit with history or social studies as well as research into the country of origin of the rhyme or the historical significance. For Example: "Ring Around the Rosie" could be used to introduce a unit on the black death and how the nursery rhyme developed because of it. Because of the varying view points of the individual artists there is sure to be at least one rhyme and corresponding graphics that will appeal to all audiences regardless of their age, but some topics might be a bit to dark or disturbing for very young readers even though children have been skipping rope to some of these for decades.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shelby Soukup

    My first graphic novel is "Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists" by Chris Duffy. I chose this as one of my graphic novels because I personally think that Nursery Rhymes are so fun for younger elementary students to read. Also, I loved the illustrations in this graphic novel! They are all so bright and colorful that I had no doubt each page would catch the student's eyes. I think that when introducing this book to a class of young readers, I would start off by r My first graphic novel is "Nursery Rhyme Comics: 50 Timeless Rhymes from 50 Celebrated Cartoonists" by Chris Duffy. I chose this as one of my graphic novels because I personally think that Nursery Rhymes are so fun for younger elementary students to read. Also, I loved the illustrations in this graphic novel! They are all so bright and colorful that I had no doubt each page would catch the student's eyes. I think that when introducing this book to a class of young readers, I would start off by relating the text to myself because all of the nursery rhymes in this book I remember hearing hundreds of times as a child. Then, I would also inform the students that these same nursery rhymes are loved by children around the world, which helps them connect this books to the world around them. I would then ask if any of the students know any nursery rhymes. This would help relate the text to the student. Next, we would read the book, maybe by reading a couple nursery rhymes each day. Each day, I would ask if the students have hear any of these nursery rhymes before. I would also ask them if they've ever read any book that was similar to any of the stories of the nursery rhymes. Since these nursery rhymes are a little odd compared to most books, relating this text to any other text would probably have to be based on simple things such as characters. I would love to see how my future students would react to this graphic novel because it is great for young readers.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    3.5 stars, but I bumped it up because it's fun and lovely. Some of the comics were really beautiful, funny, subtle, and silly and others were really ham-fisted and disappointing. But (I think) the longest comic in here is only like 3 pages, so you can just skip to the next one. My usual comics loves stood out: Eleanor Davis (The queen of hearts), Lilli Carré (Sing a song of sixpence), Mike Mignola (Solomon Grundy), Lucy Knisley (There was an old woman who lived in a shoe), Tony Millionaire (Rub-a-dub-dub), Kate Beaton (The grand Duke o 3.5 stars, but I bumped it up because it's fun and lovely. Some of the comics were really beautiful, funny, subtle, and silly and others were really ham-fisted and disappointing. But (I think) the longest comic in here is only like 3 pages, so you can just skip to the next one. My usual comics loves stood out: Eleanor Davis (The queen of hearts), Lilli Carré (Sing a song of sixpence), Mike Mignola (Solomon Grundy), Lucy Knisley (There was an old woman who lived in a shoe), Tony Millionaire (Rub-a-dub-dub), Kate Beaton (The grand Duke of York), and Vera Brosgol (There was a little girl). There were some other impressive illustrators/comics people I had never heard of too. By and large the ones by people I had never heard of were disappointingly illustrated and a little cloying.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amory Blaine

    From the cover art and title, this book appears aimed at young children. Inside, however, the illustrations are intricate and the lyrical stories often dark and absurd. Diverse artwork highlight the odd tales we all grew up obliviously reciting. (How could a little woman live in a shoe? Why should Jack jump over a candlestick? Etc infinity!) Most of the endings are abrupt, and many bizarre, like when a random maid's nose is snatched off by a crow. Some artists work to subvert the dark subtext of From the cover art and title, this book appears aimed at young children. Inside, however, the illustrations are intricate and the lyrical stories often dark and absurd. Diverse artwork highlight the odd tales we all grew up obliviously reciting. (How could a little woman live in a shoe? Why should Jack jump over a candlestick? Etc infinity!) Most of the endings are abrupt, and many bizarre, like when a random maid's nose is snatched off by a crow. Some artists work to subvert the dark subtext of their tales, like Raina Telgemeier, who places Georgie Porgie in the context of a cupcake-hurling kids' party, or Lucy Knisley who stretches a line past incredulity to avoid illustrating child abuse. Others embrace it. A particular favorite with the kids I read this to (ages six and nine) was an unusual rendition of Rub-a-Dub-Dub, which has the familiar butcher, baker, and candlestick-maker all jumping out of a rotten potato! I had never heard that version, but the kids quote it constantly now, and it's even spawned our own sprawling rendition, complete with rotten french fries. And that, like this book, is a testimony to the ever-evolving and yet timeless history of nursery rhymes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    I gotta be honest - I wanted more from this. It's an impressive undertaking. Most of the contributions are supershort - on average one spread - and getting all these superstar comic artists to draw for this must have been quite a job. The production is lovely - every comic is lavishly colored, even though the book includes a crazy variety of visual styles. But. I wanted more interpretation here. More embellishment. More playing. Too many of these are relatively straight ill I gotta be honest - I wanted more from this. It's an impressive undertaking. Most of the contributions are supershort - on average one spread - and getting all these superstar comic artists to draw for this must have been quite a job. The production is lovely - every comic is lavishly colored, even though the book includes a crazy variety of visual styles. But. I wanted more interpretation here. More embellishment. More playing. Too many of these are relatively straight illustrations of the mondofamiliar words and it felt anticlimactic when there was no twist. There are absolutely exceptions for this (calling out my girl Raina Telgemeier here, for one) where there was a punch line, a visual explanation for a questionable phrase (Lucy Knisley FTW), or even some added commentary by the characters (yo James Sturm), but most of these guys played things WAY too straight. That said, what a fun way for kids to get to know these awesome artists. And compare/contrast different comic styles. And even think about what fracturing a fairytale really means. And yeah.

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